Rainbow's End: Irish-Americans and the Dilemmas of Urban Machine Politics, 1840-1985

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University of California Press, Aug 9, 1990 - History - 359 pages
Unprecedented in its scope, Rainbow's End provides a bold new analysis of the emergence, growth, and decline of six classic Irish-American political machines in New York, Jersey City, Chicago, San Francisco, Pittsburgh and Albany. Combining the approaches of political economy and historical sociology, Erie examines a wide range of issues, including the relationship between city and state politics, the manner in which machines shaped ethnic and working-class politics, and the reasons why centralized party organizations failed to emerge in Boston and Philadelphia despite their large Irish populations. The book ends with a thorough discussion of the significance of machine politics for today's urban minorities.
 

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Contents

2 Building the NineteenthCentury Machines 18401896
25
The Irish Versus the New Immigrants 18961928
67
The Depression the New Deal and Changing Machine Fortunes 19281950
107
5 The Last Hurrah? Machines in the Postwar Era 19501985
140
6 Machine Building IrishAmerican Style
191
Machines Immigrants and the Working Class
236
Notes
267
Bibliography
305
Index
333
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About the author (1990)

Steven P. Erie is Professor Emeritus of Political Science at the University of California, San Diego.

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