Wuhan, 1938: War, Refugees, and the Making of Modern China

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University of California Press, May 21, 2008 - History - 204 pages
During the spring of 1938, a flood of Chinese refugees displaced by the Anti-Japanese War (1937-1945) converged on the central Yangzi valley tricity complex of Wuhan. For ten remarkable months, in a highly charged atmosphere of carnage, heroism, and desperation, Wuhan held out against the Japanese in what would become a turning point in the war—and one that attracted international attention. Stephen MacKinnon for the first time tells the full story of Wuhan's defense and fall, and how the siege's aftermath led to new directions in the history of modern Chinese culture, society, and politics.
 

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Contents

Prologue
1
1 WUHAN BEFORE THE WAR
5
MILITARY LEADERSHIP AND STRATEGY
18
3 THE BATTLE FOR XUZHOU AND THE DEFENSE OF WUHAN
31
4 WUHANS REFUGEE CRISIS
44
5 CULTURE AND THE PRESS
62
6 MOBILIZING YOUTH
83
THE INTERNATIONAL DIMENSION
97
Conclusion
111
Wartime Wuhan a Chronology
119
Notes
123
Glossary
145
Bibliography
149
Index
169
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About the author (2008)

Stephen R. MacKinnon is Professor of History at Arizona State University. He is author of Power and Politics in Late Imperial China: Yuan Shi-Kai in Beijing and Tianhun, 1901-1908, and coauthor of China Reporting: An Oral History of American Journalism in the 1930s and 1940s and Agnes Smedley: The Life and Times of an American Radical, all published by UC Press. He is the editor, with Diana Lary and Ezra Vogel, of China at War: Regions of China, 1937-45, among other books.

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