Diasporas

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University of California Press, Feb 4, 2008 - Social Science - 160 pages
Coined in the third century B.C., the term diaspora has evolved into a buzzword used to describe the migrations of groups as diverse as ethnic populations, religious communities, and even engineers working abroad. This concise book provides a critical introduction to the concept of diaspora, bringing a fresh, synthetic perspective to virtually all aspects of this topic. Stéphane Dufoix incorporates a wealth of case studies—about the Jewish, Armenian, African, Chinese, Greek, and Indian experiences— to illustrate key concepts, give a clear overview on current thinking, and reassess the value of the term for us today.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Chapter 1 What Is a Diaspora?
4
Chapter 2 The Spaces of Dispersion
35
Holding On and Letting Go
59
Chapter 4 Managing Distance
80
Conclusion
106
Notes
109
Bibliography
125

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About the author (2008)

Stéphane Dufoix is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Paris X-Nanterre. He is a member of the Sophiapol (Political sociology, philosophy, and anthropology, Paris-X) and of the Centre d'histoire sociale du XXe siècle, the author of Politiques d'exil , and the editor, with Patrick Weil, of L'Esclavage, la colonisation, et après . . . France, Etats-Unis, Grande-Bretagne . He is a junior member of the Institut universitaire de France.

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