Jack Johnson, Rebel Sojourner: Boxing in the Shadow of the Global Color Line

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University of California Press, May 14, 2012 - Sports & Recreation - 376 pages
In his day, Jack Johnson—born in Texas, the son of former slaves—was the most famous black man on the planet. As the first African American World Heavyweight Champion (1908–1915), he publicly challenged white supremacy at home and abroad, enjoying the same audacious lifestyle of conspicuous consumption, masculine bravado, and interracial love wherever he traveled. Jack Johnson, Rebel Sojourner provides the first in-depth exploration of Johnson’s battles against the color line in places as far-flung as Sydney, London, Cape Town, Paris, Havana, and Mexico City. In relating this dramatic story, Theresa Runstedtler constructs a global history of race, gender, and empire in the early twentieth century.
 

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Jack Johnson, Rebel Sojourner: Boxing in the Shadow of the Global Color Line

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Heavyweight champion Jack Johnson (1878–1946) was given to living large, embarrassing white opponents, and consorting with white women at a time when Jim Crow flourished at home and the doctrine of ... Read full review

Contents

Jack Johnson Rebel Sojourner
1
Jack Johnson and the White Pacific
31
The JeffriesJohnson Fight Film Controversy
68
The Rise of the British Boxing Colour Bar
101
African American Boxers and the Search for Exile
132
Black Bodies and French Regeneration
164
6 Viva Johnson Fighting over Race in the Americas
196
The French Jack Johnson and the Rising Tide of Color
231
Visible Men Harmless Icons
253
Notes
263
Bibliography
323
Index
339
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About the author (2012)

Theresa Runstedtler is Assistant Professor of American Studies at the University of Buffalo.

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