Sweet Promises: A Reader on Indian-White Relations in Canada

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University of Toronto Press, Jan 1, 1991 - History - 468 pages

In his earlier work, Skyscrapers Hide the Heavens, J.R. Miller explored the history of relations between whites and native peoples in Canada. Sweet Promises is a companion volume. It brings together the work of a number of scholars on a wide range of issues in Indian-white relations, and develops many of the themes identified in the earlier work.

The articles, all previously published, are concerned with developments in the various regions of Canada from the days of New France to the present. They deal with the early military alliances, relations at the time of the fur trade, civil Indian policy, treaties and reserves, the Northwest Rebellion, the impact of religion and agricultural and educational policies, the emergence of native political organization, differing attitudes towards the environment, and the struggle for aboriginal rights and contemporary land claims disputes. In a new introduction Miller provides an overview of the history of Indian- white relations over five centuries, and in the conclusion he draws together the themes discussed in the volume.

 

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Contents

BRUCE G TRIGGER The Iesuits and the Fur Trade
3
during the French Régime
19
OLIVE PATRICIA DICKASON Amerindians between French and English
45
BARBARA GRAYMONT The Six Nations Indians in the Revolutionary War
93
GEORGE PG STANLEY The Indians in the War of 1812
105
Emergence of Civil Indian Policy
125
and Constitutional Change
145
Emerging Relationship in Western Canada
155
Northwest Rebellion
243
Relations on the Pacific
277
of a Model Indian Community
294
The Policy of the Bible and the Plough
321
Emergence of Native Political Organization
381
Contemporary Disputes
403
Native Peoples and the Environment
439
THE BRUNDTLAND REPORT
447

Traditional Premises and Necessary Innovations
207

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About the author (1991)

J.R. Miller is a Canada Research Chair and professor in the Department of History at the University of Saskatchewan.

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