Stalin's Empire of Memory: Russian-Ukrainian Relations in the Soviet Historical Imagination

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University of Toronto Press, Jan 1, 2004 - History - 231 pages

Based on declassified materials from eight Ukrainian and Russian archives, Stalin's Empire of Memory, offers a complex and vivid analysis of the politics of memory under Stalinism. Using the Ukrainian republic as a case study, Serhy Yekelchyk elucidates the intricate interaction between the Kremlin, non-Russian intellectuals, and their audiences.

Yekelchyk posits that contemporary representations of the past reflected the USSR's evolution into an empire with a complex hierarchy among its nations. In reality, he argues, the authorities never quite managed to control popular historical imagination or fully reconcile Russia's 'glorious past' with national mythologies of the non-Russian nationalities.

Combining archival research with an innovative methodology that links scholarly and political texts with the literary works and artistic images, Stalin's Empire of Memory presents a lucid, readable text that will become a must-have for students, academics, and anyone interested in Russian history.

 

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Contents

SOVIET NATIONAL PATRIOTS
13
Between Class and Nation
15
Remembering the Nation
19
The Great Ukrainian People
24
THE UNBREAKABLE UNION
33
The Unifying Past
34
Ranking Friends and Brothers
39
Ukraine Reunited
47
Defining the Ancient Past
93
Remembering the Empire
96
Narrating the Nation
102
DEFINING THE NATIONAL HERITAGE
108
The Ukrainian Classics
109
In the House of History
114
Sites of Remembrance
120
EMPIRE AND NATION IN THE ARTISTIC IMAGINATION
129

REINVENTING IDEOLOGICAL ORTHODOXY
53
Confusing Signals from Above
54
The Ukrainian Zhdanovshchina
62
Fashioning an Acceptable Past
66
THE UNFINISHED CRUSADE OF 1947
72
The Enforced Dialogue
73
The Attack on Historians
77
The Campaigns Nationalist Echoes
84
WRITING A STALINIST HISTORY OF UKRAINE
88
The Quest for a New Memory
89
Writers Licence
130
Filmmakers and Artists Imagine the Past
137
History at the Opera
145
EPILOGUE
153
The Last Stalinist Festival
154
After Stalin
159
Notes
163
Bibliography
199
Index
217
Copyright

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Page 7 - [n]ationalism is rarely the nationalism of the nation, but rather marks the site where different representations of the nation contest and negotiate with each other.
Page 8 - [G]eneral history starts only when tradition ends and the social memory is fading or breaking up,
Page x - 2001 by University of Pittsburgh Press. Used by permission of the University of Pittsburgh Press.

About the author (2004)

SERHY YEKELCHYK is an assistant professor in the Departments of History and Germanic and Russian Studies at the University of Victoria.

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