Omega: The Last Days of the World

Front Cover
U of Nebraska Press, 1999 - Fiction - 287 pages
Omega, written by astronomer Camille Flammarion (1842?1925), is no less than an epic history of our future?a startling and unforgettable vision of the end of the world. Reasoned scientific speculation combined with probing philosophical inquiry lend credibility and magnitude to this tale of how humankind will physically and culturally evolve over the next several million years. The end begins in the twenty-fifth century, when a comet threatens to collide with the earth. The consequences of that frightening cosmic event are far-reaching, setting in motion a series of physical, psychic, and social changes that will profoundly affect the planet and its people far into the future. The earth?s surface drastically transforms over time. Cultures radically alter, collapse, and fade away. Nations rise and fall, species become extinct, and human beings find themselves at the end of the world, alone and changed in fundamental ways. This melancholic, poetic science fiction tale of things to come is as compelling and disturbing today as when it was first written.
 

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Contents

Section 1
7
Section 2
33
Section 3
40
Section 4
53
Section 5
82
Section 6
105
Section 7
115
Section 8
122
Section 12
169
Section 13
171
Section 14
196
Section 15
204
Section 16
237
Section 17
242
Section 18
249
Section 19
256

Section 9
133
Section 10
143
Section 11
166
Section 20
260
Section 21
280
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Camille Flammarion was a well-known French astronomer and writer who popularized science in the late nineteenth century. Robert Silverberg, an acclaimed science fiction writer, is the recipient of many awards, including multiple Hugo and Nebula awards.

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