Amorphous Semiconductors: Structural, Optical, and Electronic Properties

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Amorphous semiconductors are subtances in the amorphous solid state that have the properties of a semiconductor and which are either covalent or tetrahedrally bonded amorphous semiconductors or chelcogenide glasses.

  • Developed from both a theoretical and experimental viewpoint
  • Deals with, amongst others, preparation techniques, structural, optical and electronic properties, and light induced phenomena
  • Explores different types of amorphous semiconductors including amorphous silicon, amorphous semiconducting oxides and chalcogenide glasses
  • Applications include solar cells, thin film transistors, sensors, optical memory devices and flat screen devices including televisions
 

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Contents

Electronic Structure of Amorphous Semiconductors
43
References
58
Defect Creation
131
References
145
Electronic and Optical Properties
157
References
218
Other Amorphous Material Systems
231
Applications
247
3
248
18
255
Index
265
Copyright

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About the author (2017)

Kazuo Morigaki, Professor Emeritus, University of Tokyo. Morigaki received his Ph.D. degree in physics from Osaka University in 1959. Since then, he has joined Osaka University, Sony Corporation Research Laboratory, Centre d’Etudes Nuclčares de Saclay, University of Tokyo (Institute for Solid State Physics), Yamaguchi University and Hiroshima Institute of Technology.

Sandor Kugler, Associate Professor, Department of Theoretical Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary. Kugler received both his degree in and his PhD in physics from ELTE, Budapest. He joined the quantum theory group, Institute of Physics, Technical University of Budapest, during 1974-1993 as research associate. Since 1993, he has been Associate Professor.

Koichi Shimakawa, Professor Emeritus and Fellow, Gifu University, Japan. Shimakawa received his PhD from Nagoya University in 1975. Since then, he has been at Gifu University, becoming Professor in the period 1989-2008. He retired from Gifu University in 2008, and is senior researcher, Nagoya Industrial Science Institute, Nagoya, and visiting Professor, Department of Chemistry, University of Pardubice, Czech Republic.

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