The Development of Kant's View of Ethics

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John Wiley & Sons, Jul 1, 2019 - Philosophy - 352 pages

Originally published in 1972, The Development of Kant's Ethics is Keith Ward's exceptional analysis of the history of Kant's ideas on ethics and the emergence of Kantian ethics as a mature theory. Through a thorough overview of all of Kant's texts written between 1755 and 1804, Ward puts forth the argument that the critical literature surrounding Kantian ethics has underplayed Kant's concern with the role of happiness in relation to morality and the significance of the tradition of natural law for the development of Kantian ethics.

Covering all of Kant's extant works from Nova Dilucidatio to Opus Postumum, Ward traces the progression of Kant's views from his early ideas on Rationalism to Moral Sense Theory and the development of Critical Philosophy, and finally to his later-life writings on the relationship between morality and faith. Through careful analysis of each of Kant's works, Ward details the scientific, philosophical, and theological ideas that influenced Kant—such as the works of Emanuel Swedenborg—and demonstrates the critical role these influences played in the development of Kantian ethics.

Offering a rare and extraordinary historical view of some of Kant's most important contributions to philosophy, this is an invaluable resource for scholars engaged in questions on the origins and influences of Kant's work, and for students seeking a thorough understanding of Kant's historical and philosophical contexts.

 

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Contents

THE DOCTRINE OF MORAL
21
THE DREAMS OF METAPHYSICS
34
THE POSTULATES OF PRACTICAL
84
THE SUPREME PRINCIPLE
99
MORALITY AND RELIGION
144
THE FINAL VIEW OF ETHICS
160
the metaphysical context of Kants ethics
168
Schilpps Kants PreCritical Ethics
177
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About the author (2019)

Keith Ward is Professor of the Philosophy of Religion at Roehampton University, London. His former positions have included Dean and Director of Studies in Philosophy at Trinity Hall, Cambridge; Regius Professor of Divinity at Oxford University; and lecturer of philosophy at the University of Glasgow, the University of St. Andrews, and King’s College, London. He has published widely in the fields of philosophy, religion, and Christian theology.

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