You Can Only Yell at Me for One Thing at a Time: Rules for Couples

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Celadon Books, Jan 14, 2020 - Humor - 112 pages

The perfect Valentine’s Day or anniversary gift: An illustrated collection of love and relationship advice from New Yorker writer Patricia Marx, with illustrations from New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast.
Everyone’s heard the old advice for a healthy relationship: Never go to bed angry. Play hard to get. Sexual favors in exchange for cleaning up the cat vomit is a good and fair trade.

Okay, not that last one. It’s one of the tips in You Can Only Yell at Me for One Thing at a Time: Rules for Couples by the authors of Why Don’t You Write My Eulogy Now So I Can Correct It: A Mother’s Suggestions. This guide will make you laugh, remind you why your relationship is better than everyone else’s, and solve all your problems.

Nuggets of advice include:

If you must breathe, don’t breathe so loudly.

It is easier to stay inside and wait for the snow to melt than to fight about who should shovel.

Queen-sized beds, king-sized blankets.

Why not give this book to your significant or insignificant other, your anti-Valentine’s Day crusader pal, or anyone who can’t live with or without love?

 

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About the author (2020)

Author: Patricia Marx has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1989. She is a former writer for Saturday Night Live and Rugrats, and is the author of several books, including Let's Be Less Stupid, Him Her Him Again The End of Him, and Starting from Happy. Marx was the first woman elected to the Harvard Lampoon. She has taught at Princeton, New York University, and Stonybrook University. She is recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship.

Illustrator: Roz Chast has loved to draw cartoons since she was a child growing up in Brooklyn. She attended Rhode Island School of Design, majoring in Painting because it seemed more artistic. However, soon after graduating, she reverted to type and began drawing cartoons once again. She is the author of the #1 New York Times bestselling memoir Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant?

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