The Haunting of Tram Car 015

Front Cover
Tom Doherty Associates, Feb 19, 2019 - Fiction - 160 pages

P. Djl Clark returns to the historical fantasy universe of "A Dead Djinn in Cairo", with the otherworldly adventure novella The Haunting of Tram Car 015.

Finalist for the 2020 Hugo Award
Finalist for the 2020 Nebula Award
Finalist for the 2020 Locus Award


Cairo, 1912: The case started as a simple one for the Ministry of Alchemy, Enchantments and Supernatural Entities — handling a possessed tram car.

Soon, however, Agent Hamed Nasr and his new partner Agent Onsi Youssef are exposed to a new side of Cairo stirring with suffragettes, secret societies, and sentient automatons in a race against time to protect the city from an encroaching danger that crosses the line between the magical and the mundane.

At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
8
4 stars
10
3 stars
4
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - TadAD - LibraryThing

I didn't enjoy this quite as much as I did A Dead Djinn in Cairo. I felt it relied on the exotic locale more than characters and plotting. Still enjoyable and I'll try the author's novel next. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bell7 - LibraryThing

Agent Hamed Nasr and his new partner, Onsi Youssef, are called upon to solve the mystery of a haunted tram car and send the spirit packing. This novella is set in the same steampunk-fantasy blended ... Read full review

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2019)

P. Djli Clark is the author of the novellas The Black God’s Drums (August 2018), winner of a 2019 Alex Award from the American Library Association, and The Haunting of Tram Car 015 (February 2019). His short stories have twice made the Locus Recommended Reading List and have appeared in online venues such as Fireside Fiction, Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Heroic Fantasy Quarterly, and in print anthologies including Griots, Hidden Youth, and Clockwork Cairo. He is loosely associated with the quarterly FIYAH: A Magazine of Black Speculative Fiction and an infrequent reviewer at Strange Horizons. He currently resides in New England and ruminates on issues of diversity in speculative fiction at his blog The Disgruntled Haradrim.

Bibliographic information