Integrated Molecular and Cellular Biophysics

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Springer Science & Business Media, Jun 17, 2008 - Science - 250 pages
Biophysics represents perhaps one of the best examples of interdisciplinary research areas, where concepts and methods from disciplines such as physics, biology, b- chemistry, colloid chemistry, and physiology are integrated. It is by no means a new ?eld of study and has actually been around, initially as quantitative physiology and partly as colloid science, for over a hundred years. For a long time, biophysics has been taught and practiced as a research discipline mostly in medical schools and life sciences departments, and excellent biophysics textbooks have been published that are targeted at a biologically literate audience. With a few exceptions, it is only relatively recently that biophysics has started to be recognized as a physical science and integrated into physics departments’ curr- ula, sometimes under the new name of biological physics. In this period of cryst- lization and possible rede?nition of biophysics, there still exists some uncertainty as to what biophysics might actually represent. A particular tendency among phy- cists is to associate biophysics research with the development of powerful new te- niques that should eventually be used not by physicists to study physical processes in living matter, but by biologists in their biological investigations. There is value in that judgment, and excellent books have been published that introduce the int- ested reader to the use of physical principles for the development of new methods of investigation in life sciences.
 

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Contents

The Molecular Basis of Life
7
Interactions Between Polar Entities
8
112 van der Waals Interactions
10
12 Water and Polar Interactions
18
121 Physical Properties of Water
19
122 Overview of the Importance of Water for the Living Matter State
28
123 The pH
29
13 Hydrophobic Interactions and Molecular SelfAssociation
30
443 Main Characteristics of Facilitated Transport
120
References
122
Reaction Diffusion and Dimensionality
123
512 Determination of Affinity Constant by Equilibrium Dialysis
125
513 Competitive Binding
127
514 Allosteric Activation and Inhibition of Binding
128
52 Introduction to Fractals
131
521 The Measure of Everything
132

132 Amphiphilic Molecules
31
References
37
The Composition and Architecture of the Cell
39
211 Eukaryotic Cells
40
212 Cellular SelfReproduction
43
213 Cellular Metabolism
46
22 Proteins
47
222 Protein Folding
57
The Cells Legislative Power
60
232 DNA Replication Gene Autoreproduction
66
24 Determination of Molecular Structure
68
References
70
Cell Membrane Structure and Physical Properties
73
311 Chemical Composition of the Plasma Membrane
74
312 Spatial Architecture of the Plasma Membrane
75
32 Surface Charges
78
322 Electrical Double Layer
79
33 Static Electrical Properties of Planar Membranes
88
332 Dielectric Relaxation of a Dielectric MultiLayer
90
333 Dielectric Properties of Random Suspensions of Particles with Particular Relevance to Biological Cells
95
References
98
Substance Transport Across Membranes
101
42 Diffusion in Biological Systems
103
422 Simple Diffusion Through Membranes
105
423 Determination of Membrane Permeability from Membrane Potential Energy Profile
107
43 Osmosis and Osmotic Pressure
110
431 vant Hoff Laws
111
432 Deviations from vant Hoff Laws
113
433 Osmotic Pressure of Biological Liquids
114
434 The Cellular Osmotic Pressure Menace
115
44 Facilitated Transport
116
522 Examples of Fractals of Biological Interest
136
523 Practical Considerations and Limitations of the Above Theory
138
53 Fractal Diffusion and the Law of Mass Action
140
531 Diffusion on Fractal Lattices
141
532 The CarrierMediated Transport of Glucose Revisited
143
References
145
Electrophysiology and Excitability
147
611 Models for Calculating the Transmembrane Potential
149
62 Excitable Membranes
155
622 The VoltageClamp Technique and Transmembrane Ionic Currents
160
623 The HodgkinHuxley Model of Action Potential
164
References
171
Structure and Function of Molecular Machines
173
711 Electrical Behavior of Individual Ion Channels
174
712 Structural Characterization by XRay Crystallography
177
72 XRay Investigations of Channels and Pores
181
73 Ion Pumps 731 The NaKATPase
185
732 Other Ionic Pumps
188
74 Light Absorption in Photosynthesis
189
742 Thermodynamics of Light Absorption
190
References
192
ProteinProtein Interactions
195
811 Elementary Theory of Fluorescence and FRET
197
812 FRETBased Determinations of Interaction Stoichiometry 8121 Theory
201
82 Structural Studies of ProteinProtein Interactions
209
822 Chemical Shift and the NMR Spectroscopy
211
823 NMR Studies of ProteinProtein Interactions
214
References
216
Appendix
227
Index
231
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