Stanley Cavell and the Claim of Literature

Front Cover
JHU Press, Sep 23, 2013 - Literary Criticism - 285 pages
0 Reviews

Stanley Cavell is widely recognized as one of America’s most important contemporary philosophers. His writings have attracted considerable attention among literary critics and theorists. Stanley Cavell and the Claim of Literature is the first monograph to comprehensively address the importance of literature in Cavell’s philosophy, and, in turn, the potential effect of his philosophy on contemporary literary criticism.

David Rudrum dedicates a chapter to each of the principal writers that occupy Cavell, including Shakespeare, Thoreau, Beckett, Wordsworth, Ibsen, and Poe, and incorporates chapters on tragedy, skepticism, ethics, and politics. Through detailed analysis of these works, Rudrum explores Cavell’s ideas on the nature of reading; the relationships between literary language, ordinary language, and performative language; the status of authors and characters; the link between tragedy and ethics; and the nature of political conversation in a democracy.

Rudrum casts a wide net that Cavell scholars as well as people interested in the philosophy of tragedy, aesthetics, and literary skepticism will find compelling.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Approaching the Unapproachable
1
1 Making Senses of Walden
24
2 The Avoidance of Shakespeare
42
Stanley Cavells Beckett
85
4 How to Do Things with Wordsworth
99
5 What Did Cavell Want of Poe?
122
Social Contract and Marriage Contract in A Dolls House
134
Between the Skeptical and the Ethical
177
Just an Ordinary American Tragedy
222
Notes
257
Bibliography
277
Index
283
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2013)

David Rudrum is a senior lecturer in English at the University of Huddersfield. He is the editor of Literature and Philosophy: A Guide to Contemporary Debates.

Bibliographic information