The Colonial Problem: An Indigenous Perspective on Crime and Injustice in Canada

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University of Toronto Press, Jan 1, 2016 - Criminal justice, Administration of - 412 pages

Indigenous peoples are vastly overrepresented in the Canadian criminal justice system. The Canadian government has framed this disproportionate victimization and criminalization as being an "Indian problem."

In The Colonial Problem, Lisa Monchalin challenges the myth of the "Indian problem" and encourages readers to view the crimes and injustices affecting Indigenous peoples from a more culturally aware position. She analyzes the consequences of assimilation policies, dishonoured treaty agreements, manipulative legislation, and systematic racism, arguing that the overrepresentation of Indigenous peoples in the Canadian criminal justice system is not an Indian problem but a colonial one.

 

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Contents

Introduction to Indigenous Peoples in Canada
1
Indigenous Governance and Methods of Addressing
3
Residential Schools
7
Governments and Their Corporate
10
2
22
Traditional Governance and Governance Structures
40
Clan Systems
49
4
61
The Sparrow Decision and the Van der Peet
203
Haida Nation Taku River Tlingit
210
Nonrecognition of Indigenous Lands and Protection
218
Bill C45 and the Idle No More Movement
225
The Governments
242
EuroCanadian Justice Systems and Traditional
258
UnderPolicing
264
Justice System
274

5
81
Enfranchisement
110
IndianSpecific Liquor Laws and Regulating Pool Hall
116
Intergenerational Trauma
123
Genocide
130
Intergenerational Legacies and Trauma
138
Struggle
175
The National Crisis of Missing and Murdered Indigenous
184
Missing and Murdered Women in Downtown Eastside
190
Indigenous Traditions Reinvented in the Context
284
The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous
291
Creating Conversation and Reawakening Spirits
297
and Healing
303
Programs by and for Indigenous Peoples
315
Notes
323
Index
399
Copyright

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About the author (2016)

Lisa Monchalin is Algonquin, Métis, Huron, and Scottish and teaches in the Department of Criminology at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in British Columbia. She is the first Indigenous woman in Canada to hold a PhD in Criminology. Follow her on Twitter @lmonchalin.

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