Being M?ori in the City: Indigenous Everyday Life in Auckland

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University of Toronto Press, Jan 1, 2013 - Social Science - 345 pages

Indigenous peoples around the world have been involved in struggles for decolonization, self-determination, and recognition of their rights, and the M?ori of Aotearoa-New Zealand are no exception. Now that nearly 85% of the M?ori population have their main place of residence in urban centres, cities have become important sites of affirmation and struggle. Grounded in an ethnography of everyday life in the city of Auckland, Being Maori in the City is an investigation of what being M?ori means today.

One of the first ethnographic studies of M?ori urbanization since the 1970s, this book is based on almost two years of fieldwork, living with M?ori families, and more than 250 hours of interviews. In contrast with studies that have focused on indigenous elites and official groups and organizations, Being M?ori in the City shines a light on the lives of ordinary individuals and families. Using this approach, Natacha Gagné adroitly underlines how indigenous ways of being are maintained and even strengthened through change and openness to the larger society.

 

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MAORI ARE NOT INDIGENOUS TO NZ.
THEY SHARE THE SAME DNA AS TAIWANESE.
THEY WERE NOT THE FIRST INHABITANTS
IN NZ.

Contents

An overview of Māori and new Zealand history
21
Māori Lives in Auckland
48
A symbol of Continuity
87
Ways of Life in a Māori house
106
the Whānau Past and Present
148
A Practical Universe of Meanings
179
At the heart of a Politics of Differentiation
199
interconnected Places and Autonomous spaces
234
Glossary
261
References
297
Index
331
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About the author (2013)

Natacha Gagné is an associate professor in the Department of Anthropology at Université Laval.

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