The Modern Girl: Feminine Modernities, the Body, and Commodities in the 1920s

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University of Toronto Press, Jan 1, 2015 - History - 299 pages
With her short skirt, bobbed hair, and penchant for smoking, drinking, dancing, and jazz, the "Modern Girl" was a fixture of 1920s Canadian consumer culture. She appeared in art, film, fashion, and advertising, as well as on the streets of towns from coast to coast. In The Modern Girl, Jane Nicholas argues that this feminine image was central to the creation of what it meant to be modern and female in Canada. Using a wide range of visual and textual evidence, Nicholas illuminates both the frequent public debates about female appearance and the realities of feminine self-presentation. She argues that women played an active and thoughtful role in their embrace of modern consumer culture, even when it was at the risk of serious social, economic, and cultural penalties. The first book to fully examine the "Modern Girl"'s place in Canadian culture, The Modern Girl will be essential reading for all those interested in the history of gender, sexuality, and the body in the modern world. --Provided by publisher.
 

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Contents

The Canadian Modern Girl
3
Commodities Performance and Discipline
23
Beauty Expert Advice and Modern Magic
62
Urban Modernity Race and Nation
87
Contesting Feminine Modernities
122
Nude Art and the Feminine Threat
152
Cars Projectors and Publicity
184
Losing the Modern Girl
211
Notes
217
Bibliography
265
Index
285
Copyright

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About the author (2015)

Jane Nicholas is an associate professor in the Department of History and Department of Sexuality, Marriage, and Family Studies at the University of Waterloo.

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