Kouchibouguac: Removal, Resistance, and Remembrance at a Canadian National Park

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University of Toronto Press, 2016 - History - 383 pages
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In 1969, the federal and New Brunswick governments created Kouchibouguac National Park on the province's east coast. The park's creation required the relocation of more than 1200 people who lived within its boundaries. Government officials claimed the mass eviction was necessary both to allow visitors to view "nature" without the intrusion of a human presence and to improve the lives of the former inhabitants. But unprecedented resistance by the mostly Acadian residents, many of whom described their expulsion from the park as a "second deportation," led Parks Canada to end its practice of forcible removal. One resister, Jackie Vautour, remains a squatter on his land to this day.

In Kouchibouguac, Ronald Rudin draws on extensive archival research, interviews with more than thirty of the displaced families, and a wide range of Acadian cultural creations to tell the story of the park's establishment, the resistance of its residents, and the memory of that experience.

 

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Contents

On the Road Again
3
Removal
23
Resistance
135
Remembrance
223
Chez Comeau
299
Notes
307
Bibliography
367
Index
377
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About the author (2016)

Ronald Rudin is a professor in the Department of History and co-director of the Centre for Oral History and Digital Storytelling at Concordia University. His most recent book, Remembering and Forgetting in Acadie , received both the US National Council on Public History Book Award and the Public History Prize of the Canadian Historical Association.

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