The Fourth Horseman: A Kirk McGarvey Novel

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Tom Doherty Associates, Feb 23, 2016 - Fiction - 336 pages

The heart-pounding next installment in the New York Times bestselling Kirk McGarvey series

Pakistan is torn apart by riots in the streets. The CIA sends Pakistan expert David Haaris to meet with leaders of the military intelligence apparatus which all but controls the country, to try to head off what appears to be the disintegration of the government.

But Haaris has other ideas. After disguising himself, he beheads the president in front of a mob of ten thousand people and declares himself the new Messiah. He says he will bring peace and stability to the country by allying with the Taliban.

At that moment, miles to the south on the border with Afghanistan, one of four stolen nuclear weapons is detonated.

Pakistan has become the most dangerous nation in the world. Legendary former director of the CIA Kirk McGarvey is given a mission--assassinate the Messiah, code name: The Fourth Horseman.

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The Fourth Horseman

User Review  - Publishers Weekly

In Hagberg’s implausible 18th thriller featuring former CIA director Kirk McGarvey (after 2015’s Retribution), David Haaris, the hate-filled head of the CIA’s Pakistan desk, who was mocked as a ... Read full review

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About the author (2016)

David Hagberg (1947-2019) is a New York Times bestselling author who wrote numerous novels of suspense, including his bestselling thrillers featuring former CIA director Kirk McGarvey, which include Abyss, The Cabal, The Expediter, and Allah’s Scorpion. He earned a nomination for the American Book Award, three nominations for the Mystery Writers of America Edgar Allan Poe Award and three Mystery Scene Best American Mystery awards.

He spent more than thirty years researching and studying US-Soviet relations during the Cold War. Hagberg joined the Air Force out of high school, and during the height of the Cold War, he served as an Air Force cryptographer.

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