Security Aid: Canada and the Development Regime of Security

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University of Toronto Press, Jan 1, 2017 - Political Science - 292 pages

Canada is actively involved through various agencies in the domestic affairs of countries in the Global South. Over time, these practices - rationalized as a form of humanitarian assistance ? have become increasingly focused on enhancing regimes of surveillance, policing, prisons, border control, and security governance.

Drawing on an array of previously classified materials and interviews with security experts, Security Aid presents a critical analysis of the securitization of humanitarian aid. Jeffrey Monaghan demonstrates that, while Canadian humanitarian assistance may be framed around altruistic ideals, these ideals are subordinate to two overlapping objectives: the advancement of Canada's strategic interests and the development of security states in the "underdeveloped" world. Through case studies of the major aid programs in Haiti, Libya, and Southeast Asia, Security Aid provides a comprehensive analysis and reinterpretation of Canada's foreign policy agenda and its role in global affairs.

 

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Contents

An Introduction
3
Canada and the Transversal Security Community
20
Mapping Security Aid and the Geographies of InSecurity
44
Security Interventions Policing the Transversal
89
Security Infrastructures Hardware of Transversal Security
125
Security Techniques Software of Transversal Security
174
Security Aid in an Insecure World
223
References
237
Access to Information Act Requests Cited
271
Index
273
Copyright

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About the author (2017)

Jeffrey Monaghan is an assistant professor in the Institute for Criminology and Criminal Justice at Carleton University.

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