Iberianism and Crisis: Spain and Portugal at the Turn of the Twentieth Century

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University of Toronto Press, Jan 1, 2018 - Comparative literature - 246 pages

"Iberianism" refers to a minority intellectual current which emerged in Spain and Portugal during the mid-nineteenth century and developed in step with the Iberian Peninsula's successive crises. Iberianism sought to upend the peninsula's political and intellectual status quo by advocating closer ties between the two peninsular kingdoms, and more equitable relations between the Spanish state's constituent regions, including Castile, Catalonia, Basque Country, and Galicia.

Robert Patrick Newcomb's Iberianism and Crisis examines how prominent peninsular essay writers and public intellectuals, active around the turn of the twentieth century, looked to Iberianism to address a succession of political, economic, and social crises that shook the Spanish and Portuguese states to their foundations. Bringing into dialogue prominent fin-de-si?cle peninsular literary intellectuals, including Joan Maragall, Oliveira Martins, Emilia Pardo Baz?n, Antero de Quental, and Miguel de Unamuno, Newcomb engages in a comparative analysis of textual sources across national and regional borders, languages, and literary canons.

 

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Contents

Iberianism in a Time of Crisis
1
Antero de Quental Iberista A Portuguese Iberianist the Geração de 70 and the Sexenio Democrático in Spain
38
A Ribbon of Silver Representations of the PortugueseGalician Border at the Fin de Siècle
63
Miguel de Unamuno A Peninsula of Flesh and Bone
101
Joan Maragall Iberian Hymns from Catalonia
129
The Iberianist Legacy Salvador de Madariaga Reads Oliveira Martins
162
Iberianisms Lessons
195
Notes
209
Works Cited
225
Index
239
Toronto Iberic
245
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About the author (2018)

Robert Patrick Newcomb is an associate professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of California, Davis.

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