The Centennial Cure: Commemoration, Identity, and Cultural Capital in Nova Scotia during Canada's 1967 Centennial Celebrations

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University of Toronto Press, Jan 1, 2017 - History - 283 pages

In The Centennial Cure, the second volume in the Studies in Atlantic Canada History series, Meaghan Elizabeth Beaton critically examines the intersection of state policy, cultural development, and commemoration in Nova Scotia during Canada's centennial celebrations.

Beaton's engaging and insightful analysis of four case studies-- the establishment of the Cape Breton Miners' Museum, the construction of Halifax's Centennial Swimming Pool, the Community Improvement Program, and the 1967 Nova Scotia Highland Games and Folk Festival--reveals the province's attempts to reimagine and renew public spaces. Through these case studies Beaton illuminates the myriad ways in which Nova Scotians saw themselves, in the context of modernity and ethnic identity, during the post-war years. The successes and failures of these infrastructure and cultural projects, intended to foster and develop cultural capital, reflected the socio-economic realities and dreams of local communities. The Centennial Cure shifts our focus away from the dominant studies on Expo'67 to provide a nuanced and tension filled account of how Canada's 1967 centennial celebrations were experienced in other parts of Canada.

 

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Contents

Canadas 1967 Centennial Commemoration and Region
3
Producing Nova Scotias Celebrations for Canadas 1967 Centennial
23
The 1967 Nova Scotia Highland Games and Folk Festival
50
The Cape Breton Miners Museum
81
Halifaxs Aquarium and Centennial Swimming Pool
118
The Community Improvement Program
148
Canadas 1967 Centennial Commemorative Legacy
189
Notes
197
Bibliography
251
Index
273
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About the author (2017)

Meaghan Beaton is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Canadian History in the Department of History, and a faculty member with the Canadian-American Studies Program, at Western Washington University.

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