Black Racialization and Resistance at an Elite University

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University of Toronto Press, May 18, 2020 - Education - 224 pages

The presence and experiences of Black people at elite universities have been largely underrepresented and erased from institutional histories. This book engages with a collection of these experiences that span half a century and reflect differences in class, gender, and national identifications among Black scholars. By mapping Black people's experiences of studying and teaching at McGill University, this book reveals how the "whiteness" of the university both includes and exceeds the racial identities of students and professors. It highlights the specific functions of Blackness and of anti-Blackness within society in general and within the institution of higher education in particular, demonstrating how structures and practices of the university reproduce interlocking systems of oppression that uphold racial capitalism, reproduce colonial relations, and promote settler nationalism. Critically engaging the work of Black learners, academics, organizers, and activists within this dynamic political context, this book underscores the importance of Black Studies across North America.

 

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Contents

Prelude
3
The University as a Site of Struggle
12
2 Colonial Legacies and Canadian Ivy
32
3 Trying to Keep Canada White and the Power to Write History
45
4 The Idealized Elite University
66
5 Being and Becoming Black
104
6 Academic Service and Resistance within the Neoliberal University
136
Towards Informed Decision Making
153
Notes
161
Bibliography
181
Index
213
Copyright

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About the author (2020)

rosalind hampton is an assistant professor in the Department of Social Justice Education at the University of Toronto

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