Talking Back to the Indian Act: Critical Readings in Settler Colonial Histories

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University of Toronto Press, Jan 1, 2018 - Indians of North America - 218 pages

Talking Back to the Indian Act is a comprehensive "how-to" guide for engaging with primary source documents. The intent of the book is to encourage readers to develop the skills necessary to converse with primary sources in more refined and profound ways. As a piece of legislation that is central to Canada's relationship with Indigenous peoples and communities, and one that has undergone many amendments, the Indian Act is uniquely positioned to act as a vehicle for this kind of focused reading.

Through an analysis of thirty-five sources pertaining to the Indian Act--addressing governance, gender, enfranchisement, and land--the authors provide readers with a much better understanding of this pivotal piece of legislation, as well as insight into the dynamics involved in its creation and maintenance.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Chapter 1 The 1876 Indian Act
35
Chapter 2 Governance
59
Chapter 3 Enfranchisement
95
Chapter 4 Gender
127
Chapter 5 Land
161
Reading Historically
201
The Indian Act in Historical ContextTimeline
203
Index
207
Copyright

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About the author (2018)

Mary-Ellen Kelm is Canada Research Chair and Professor in the Department of History at Simon Fraser University.

Keith D. Smith teaches in the Departments of Indigenous/Xwulmuxw Studies and History at Vancouver Island University.

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