Costly Fix: Power, Politics, and Nature in the Tar Sands

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University of Toronto Press, Jan 1, 2018 - Oil sands industry - 364 pages

Costly Fix examines the post-1995 Alberta tar sands boom, detailing how the state inflated the profitability of the tar sands and turned a blind eye to environmental issues. It considers the position of First Nations, the character and strength of environmental critiques, and the difficulties that environmental groups and First Nations have had in establishing a countermovement to market fundamentalism. The final chapter discusses how Alberta's new NDP government, in its first couple of years, has addressed the legacies they have inherited from the previous Progressive Conservative government on climate change, royalties, and the blight of tailings ponds in the boreal forest. Throughout the book, Urquhart demonstrates that too many actors have done too little to prevent Alberta's boreal forest from becoming a landscape sacrificed for unsustainable economic growth.

 

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Contents

A NeoLiberal Klondike
1
Market Fundamentalism and the State
14
State Capital and the Foundations of Exploiting the Tar Sands
30
Building Canadas Oil Factory Reregulating the Tar Sands
64
Landscape of Sacrifice The Environmental Consequences of Reregulating the Tar Sands
103
First Nations Resistance and Compromise
138
Prison Break? The Political Economy of Royalty Reform
175
Taking Environmental Issues Abroad Toxic Tailings Dead Ducks
199
The Tar Sands and the Politics of Climate Change
235
An Inconvenient Truth New Government Same Approach
270
Conclusion Market Fundamentalism in the Tar Sands
298
Oil Sands Production 19952015 BPD 000s
318
References
319
Index
352
Copyright

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About the author (2018)

Ian Urquhart is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Alberta.

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