Savage Frontier Volume 3: Rangers, Riflemen, and Indian Wars in Texas, 1840-1841, Volume 3

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University of North Texas Press, Mar 30, 2007 - History - 436 pages
Annotation This third volume of the Savage Frontier series focuses on the evolution of the Texas Rangers and frontier warfare in Texas during the years 1840 and 1841. Comanche Indians were the leading rival to the pioneers during this period. Peace negotiations in San Antonio collapsed during the Council House Fight, prompting what would become known as the "Great Comanche Raid" in the summer of 1840. Stephen L. Moore covers the resulting Battle of Plum Creek and other engagements in new detail. Rangers, militiamen, and volunteers made offensive sweeps into West Texas and the Cross Timbers area of present Dallas-Fort Worth. During this time Texas' Frontier Regiment built a great military road, roughly parallel to modern Interstate 35. Moore also shows how the Colt repeating pistol came into use by Texas Rangers. Finally, he sets the record straight on the battles of the legendary Captain Jack Hays. Through extensive use of primary military documents and first-person accounts, Moore provides a clear view of life as a frontier fighter in the Republic of Texas. The reader will find herein numerous and painstakingly recreated muster rolls, as well as casualty lists and a compilation of 1841 rangers and minutemen. For the exacting historian or genealogist of early Texas, the Savage Frontier series is an indispensable resource on early nineteenth-century Texas frontier warfare.
 

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Contents

1 THE COMANCHES
1
2 THE COUNCIL HOUSE FIGHT
21
3 SPRING EXPEDITIONS
35
4 THE GREAT COMANCHE RAID
77
5 IF WE CANT WHIP EM WE CAN TRY
97
6 MOORES COMANCHE VILLAGE RAID
129
7 THE GREAT MILITARY ROAD
159
8 THE NEW FRONTIER MINUTEMEN
179
12 THE GULF COAST MINUTEMEN
279
13 BRAVO TOO MUCH
309
14 ENCHANTED ROCK AND BIRDS FORT
341
AFTERWORD
357
APPENDIX A
361
APPENDIX B
363
CHAPTER NOTES
373
BIBLIOGRAPHY
399

9 THE LEWIS EXPEDITION
219
10 THE VILLAGE CREEK EXPEDITION
235
11 ACTIVE AND ENERGETIC MEASURES
253

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Page 21 - Her head, arms and face were full of bruises, and sores, and her nose actually burnt off to the bone — all the fleshy end gone, and a great scab formed on the end of the bone. Both nostrils were wide open and denuded of flesh.
Page 31 - Mr, Maverick rushed into the street, and Andrew into the back yard where I was shouting at the top of my voice "Here are Indians!" "Here are Indians!'" Three Indians had gotten in through the gate on Soledad street and were making direct for the river! One had paused near Jinny Anderson, our cook, who stood bravely in front of the children, mine and hers, with a great rock lifted in both hands above her head, and I heard her cry out to the Indian "If you don't go 'way from here I'll mash your head...
Page 32 - House, was shot and instantly killed at the beginning of the fight, and fell by the side of Captain Caldwell. The brother of this young man afterwards told me he had left home with premonition of his death being very near. Captain Caldwell was assisted back to our house and Dr. Weideman came and cut off his boot and found the bullet had gone entirely through the leg, and lodged in the boot, where it was discovered. The wound, though not dangerous, was very painful, but the doughty Captain recovered...
Page 8 - The condition of affairs necessarily resulted in bringing into existence the Texas Rangers, a military order as peculiar as it has become famous. The extensive frontier exposed to hostile inroads, together with the extremely sparse population of the country, rendered any other force of comparatively small avail. The qualifications necessary in a genuine Ranger were not, in many respects, such as are required in the ordinary soldier.
Page 26 - I do not like your answer. I told you not to come here again without bringing in the prisoners. You have come against my orders. Your women and children may depart in peace, and your braves may go and tell your people to send in the prisoners. When those prisoners are returned, your chiefs here present may likewise go free. Until then we will hold you as hostages.

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