A History of Fort Worth in Black & White: 165 Years of African-American Life

Front Cover
University of North Texas Press, Dec 15, 2015 - History - 624 pages
A History of Fort Worth in Black & White fills a long-empty niche on the Fort Worth bookshelf: a scholarly history of the city's black community that starts at the beginning with Ripley Arnold and the early settlers, and comes down to today with our current battles over education, housing, and representation in city affairs. The book's sidebars on some noted and some not-so-noted African Americans make it appealing as a school text as well as a book for the general reader.  Using a wealth of primary sources, Richard Selcer dispels several enduring myths, for instance the mistaken belief that Camp Bowie trained only white soldiers, and the spurious claim that Fort Worth managed to avoid the racial violence that plagued other American cities in the twentieth century. Selcer arrives at some surprisingly frank conclusions that will challenge current politically correct notions.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

I see misinformation

Contents

Introduction
1
The Antebellum and Civil War Years
17
Reconstruction and the Citys Beginnings 1865 1879
41
A Growing Sense of Identity 1880 1900
71
The World of Jim Crow
133
World War I Jim Crow Comes Marching Home
231
Jim Crow Rules
259
The Depression
313
World War II
363
The Early Civil Rights Years or Jim Crow in Retreat
391
Jim Crow RIP
467
The Race Is Not Always to the Swift
497
A Few Conclusions
529
Bibliography
543
Index
571
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2015)

Richard F. Selcer is a native Fort Worther who has taught in his hometown for more than forty years. He holds a Ph.D. from TCU, and has authored ten books, plus dozens of articles on Western, military, and cultural history. He has taught for years at Tarrant County College, Dallas County College, and Weatherford College.

Bibliographic information