True Sisters

Front Cover
Center Point Large Print, 2012 - Fiction - 415 pages
25 Reviews

In order to encourage Mormon converts to immigrate to Salt Lake City, a plan was implemented by Brigham Young himself. Outfitted with two-wheeled handcarts, the immigrants were then expected to walk, pushing the handcarts, for the 1,300-mile journey from Iowa City. Several "companies," as they were called, completed this perilous trek and successfully reached Salt Lake City. But for the Martin Company, one of the last groups to leave from Iowa City that year, the trip proved disastrous. More than a quarter of the 575 members froze or starved to death.

True Sisters tells the story of four women, brought together on the harrowing journey of the Martin Handcart Company and united by the promises of prosperity and salvation in a new land. Through the ties of female friendship and the strength born from suffering, each one tests the boundaries of her faith and learns the real meaning of survival along the way.

Though the characters in True Sisters are fictional, they are based on journals, stories, and accounts of real women who braved the horror and hardship of the handcart trek, finding faith, friendship, and even joy in the journey.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - vnesting - LibraryThing

Fascinating and horrific story based on the true story of the Mormon settlers who walked 1300 miles from Iowa City to Salt Lake City in the 1850s, using handcarts to haul all their possessions. THe ... Read full review

Review: True Sisters

User Review  - Amy - Goodreads

Combined some of my favorite concepts: western migration, survival under difficult circumstances, historical fiction, polygamy, and Mormons. Reminded me of One Thousand White Women meets Sister Wives in the blend of history and culture. Read full review

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About the author (2012)

Sandra Dallas graduated from the University of Denver with a degree in journalism and began her writing career as a reporter with Business Week. While a reporter, she began writing nonfiction which include Sacred Paint, which won the National Cowboy Hall of Fame Western Heritage Wrangler Award, and The Quilt That Walked to Golden, recipient of the Independent Publishers Association Benjamin Franklin Award. Turning to fiction in 1990, Sandra has published a number of novels including Buster Midnight's Cafe, Alice's Tulips, and Prayers For Sale. She is the recipient of the Women Writing the West Willa Award for New Mercies, and two-time winner of the Western Writers of America Spur Award, for The Chili Queen and Tallgrass. In addition, she was a finalist for the Colorado Book Award, the Mountain and Plains Booksellers Association Award, and a four-time finalist for the Women Writing the West Willa Award.

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