Color Atlas of Medical Bacteriology

Front Cover

This unique visual reference presents more than 750 brilliant, four-color images of bacterial isolates commonly encountered in diagnostic microbiology and the methods used to identify them, including microscopic and phenotypic characteristics, colony morphology, and biochemical properties.

  • Chapters cover the most important bacterial pathogens and related organisms, including updated taxonomy, epidemiology, pathogenicity, laboratory and antibiotic susceptibility testing, and molecular biology methodology
  • Tables summarize and compare key biochemical reactions and other significant characteristics
  • New to this edition is a separate chapter covering the latest developments in total laboratory automation
  • The comprehensive chapter on stains, media, and reagents is now augmented with histopathology images
  • A new Fast Facts chapter presents tables that summarize and illustrate the most significant details for some of the more commonly encountered organisms

For the first time, this easy-to-use atlas is available digitally for enhanced searching. Color Atlas of Medical Bacteriology remains the most valuable illustrative supplement for lectures and laboratory presentations, as well as for laboratorians, clinicians, students, and anyone interested in diagnostic medical bacteriology.

 

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Contents

Staphylococcus Micrococcus and Other
1
Enterococcus
24
Aerococcus Abiotrophia and Other Miscellaneous
30
Listeria andErysipelothrix48
49
8
62
9
70
Introduction to Enterobacterales
91
Escherichia Shigella and Salmonella
103
Bartonella
207
Francisella
210
Introduction to Anaerobic Bacteria
213
Clostridium and Clostridioides
223
Peptostreptococcus Finegoldia Anaerococcus Peptoniphilus Cutibacterium Lactobacillus Actinomyces and Other NonSporeForming Anaerobic Gram...
237
Bacteroides Porphyromonas Prevotella Fusobacterium and Other Anaerobic GramNegative Bacteria
252
Campylobacter and Arcobacter
261
Helicobacter
267

Klebsiella Enterobacter Citrobacter Cronobacter Serratia
113
Yersinia
129
Aeromonas
141
Pseudomonas
145
Burkholderia Stenotrophomonas Ralstonia Cupriavidus Pandoraea Brevundimonas Comamonas Delftia and Acidovorax
150
Acinetobacter Chryseobacterium Moraxella Methylobacterium and Other Nonfermentative GramNegative Bacilli
157
Actinobacillus Aggregatibacter Capnocytophaga Eikenella Kingella Pasteurella and Other Fastidious or Rarely Encountered GramNegative Bacilli
168
Legionella
180
Neisseria
184
Haemophilus
191
Bordetella and Related Genera
197
Brucella
203
Chlamydia
272
Mycoplasma and Ureaplasma
277
Leptospira Borrelia Treponema and Brachyspira
281
Rickettsia Orientia Ehrlichia Anaplasma and Coxiella
290
Tropheryma whipplei
297
Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing
299
Molecular Diagnosis of Bacterial Infections
307
Total Laboratory Automation
330
Bacteria
367
Index
421
Copyright

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About the author (2020)

Luis M. de la Maza became the Medical Director of the Division of Medical Microbiology at the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine in 1979, where he is also the Medical Director of the Clinical Laboratory Scientist training program. His research is focused on the formulation of a Chlamydia trachomatis vaccine.

Marie T. Pezzlo is the Senior Supervisor of the Medical Microbiology Division at the University of California, Irvine Medical Center. Throughout her career she has been an active member and supporter of the American Society for Microbiology. Her research interest has been focused on rapid detection of microorganisms, especially in urinary tract infections.

Cassiana E. Bittencourt joined the Department of Pathology at the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine in 2016 as Medical Director of the Division of Medical Microbiology. Her current interests include infectious disease histology, application of non-culture-based methods, and resident education.

Ellena M. Peterson joined the Department of Pathology at the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine in 1978. She has served as Associate Dean of Admissions for the School of Medicine and as Associate Director of the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory and presently is Program Director of the Clinical Laboratory Scientist Program. Her research has been focused on the pathogenicity of Chlamydia.

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