Understanding Social Research: Thinking Creatively about Method

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SAGE Publications, Dec 29, 2010 - Social Science - 247 pages
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The book explores methodological approaches in three key areas - personal life and relationships; places and mobilities, and socio-cultural change. These work as vehicles to expound methodological issues and challenges that are relevant across a much wider range of domains.

Understanding Social Research brings together leading researchers in the social sciences – including sociology, health, geography, psychology and social statistics - to elaborate their approach to research design and practice, based on their own research experience, and to consider what kinds of knowledge their methods can produce. Each of the contributing authors reflects on their own methods and identifies what is distinctive about them. The book contains fascinating insights into how the knowledge we produce is shaped by the methods we choose and use.

 

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Contents

ONE Creative Tensions in Social Research
1
Section I Researching Relationships and Personal Life
27
TWO Experimenting with Qualitative Methods
33
THREE Using Psychoanalytic Methodology in Psychosocial Research
49
FOUR Using Biographical and Longitudinal Methods
62
FIVE Using Social Network Analysis
75
Researching Families and Households
90
Section II Researching Place
103
NINE Using Participatory Observational andRapid Appraisal Methods
134
TEN Innovative Ways of Mapping Data About Places
150
Section III Researching Change
165
ELEVEN Using Archived Qualitative Data
169
TWELVE Whats History Got to Do With it?
181
THIRTEEN Using Qualitative Methods to Complement Randomized Controlled Trials
195
FOURTEEN Exploring the Narrative Potential of Cohort Data and Event History Analysis
210
FIFTEEN Using Longitudinal Survey Data
225

SEVEN Ethnographies of Place
107
EIGHT Using Sociotechnical Methods
120

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About the author (2010)

Jennifer Mason is Professor of Sociology at the University of Manchester.

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