Calendar of the Soul: The Year Participated

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Rudolf Steiner Press, 2006 - Body, Mind & Spirit - 60 pages
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In listening to the changing language of the year, said Rudolf Steiner, we can rediscover our individual nature. These meditative verses--one for each week of the year--help awaken a feeling of unity with nature while also stimulating self-discovery. Through intensive work, Steiner's unique meditations will lead to a greater feeling of unity with the surrounding world.

This budget-priced pocket version features Owen Barfield's pioneering translation-- "paraphrased for an English ear" --based on more than fifty years studying this text. As Barfield asserts, no simple translation can convey the real thrust of these verses. Because of this, he tries to "suggest" rather than simply reproduce the original in exact English translations.

The Calendar of the Soul is a translation of "Anthroposophischer Seelenkalender," included in Wahrspruchworte (GA 40).

 

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About the author (2006)

Austrian-born Rudolf Steiner was a noted Goethe (see Vol. 2) scholar and private student of the occult who became involved with Theosophy in Germany in 1902, when he met Annie Besant (1847--1933), a devoted follower of Madame Helena P. Blavatsky (1831--1891). In 1912 he broke with the Theosophists because of what he regarded as their oriental bias and established a system of his own, which he called Anthroposophy (anthro meaning "man"; sophia sophia meaning "wisdom"), a "spiritual science" he hoped would restore humanism to a materialistic world. In 1923 he set up headquarters for the Society of Anthroposophy in New York City. Steiner believed that human beings had evolved to the point where material existence had obscured spiritual capacities and that Christ had come to reverse that trend and to inaugurate an age of spiritual reintegration. He advocated that education, art, agriculture, and science be based on spiritual principles and infused with the psychic powers he believed were latent in everyone. The world center of the Anhthroposophical Society today is in Dornach, Switzerland, in a building designed by Steiner. The nonproselytizing society is noted for its schools.

Owen Barfield (1898-1997), the British philosopher and critic, has been called the "First and Last Inkling," because of his influence and enduring role in the group known as the Oxford Inklings. The Inklings included C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and Charles Williams. It was Barfield who first advanced the ideas about language, myth, and belief that became identified with the thinking and art of the Inklings. He is the author of numerous books, including Poetic Diction: A Study in Meaning; Romanticism Comes of Age; Unancestoral Voice; History in English Words; and Worlds Apart: A Dialogue of the 1960s. His history of the evolution of human consciousness, Saving the Appearances: A Study in Idolatry, achieved a place in the list of the "100 Best Spiritual Books of the Century.

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