Knowledge of the Higher Worlds: How is it Achieved?

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Rudolf Steiner Press, 2011 - Anthroposophy - 192 pages
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Rudolf Steiner Press has published a new series of re-edited, re-typeset, and re-designed editions of the classic, authorized translations of Rudolf Steiner's foundational books. Each volume of this series is printed in a limited edition of 1,000 copies and sewn-bound in high-quality cloth, finished with colored end papers, and includes a book-mark ribbon.

Steiner's foundational handbook for spiritual and personal development has grown more modern with time, though his methods remain clearly distinguishable from many current paths of inner work. First, Steiner's method is based on the clarity of thought normally associated with scientific research. Instead of denying clear thinking, his aim is to extend it beyond its present limitations. Second, Steiner recognizes--as do all genuine paths--that the way to spiritual experience is arduous and dangerous and calls for self-control in thought, word, and action. The human being comprises a unity, and we cannot develop knowledge without a corresponding development of feeling and will.

Steiner predicted that humanity would begin to experience a longing for forms of experience that transcended intellectual, materialistic thinking. More than a hundred years after the first publication of this book, countless means are offered for achieving transcendental experience, including Eastern meditation practices, channeling, remote viewing, and astral projection. Moreover, there has been a huge increase in the number of people who report various suprasensory perceptions, such as near-death experiences and meetings with angels. In this context, Steiner's key spiritual guidebook is needed more than ever, given its unique, precise instructions for inner training, its protective exercises, and its indications for staying grounded and centered. Knowledge of the Higher Worlds begins with the preconditions for personal development and guides the reader through the stages of initiation, its practical aspects, and its effects.
 

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Contents

Preface to the eighth edition Berlin 1918
1
How is Knowledge of the Higher Worlds
9
The Stages of Initiation
30
Initiation
56
Practical Aspects
68
The Conditions of Esoteric Training
78
Some Effects of Initiation
89
Changes in Dream Life
124
Continuity of Consciousness
132
The Division of the Personality during
140
The Guardian of the Threshold
150
Life and Death The Great Guardian of
159
Appendix to eighth edition
169
Notes
179
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Austrian-born Rudolf Steiner was a noted Goethe (see Vol. 2) scholar and private student of the occult who became involved with Theosophy in Germany in 1902, when he met Annie Besant (1847--1933), a devoted follower of Madame Helena P. Blavatsky (1831--1891). In 1912 he broke with the Theosophists because of what he regarded as their oriental bias and established a system of his own, which he called Anthroposophy (anthro meaning "man"; sophia sophia meaning "wisdom"), a "spiritual science" he hoped would restore humanism to a materialistic world. In 1923 he set up headquarters for the Society of Anthroposophy in New York City. Steiner believed that human beings had evolved to the point where material existence had obscured spiritual capacities and that Christ had come to reverse that trend and to inaugurate an age of spiritual reintegration. He advocated that education, art, agriculture, and science be based on spiritual principles and infused with the psychic powers he believed were latent in everyone. The world center of the Anhthroposophical Society today is in Dornach, Switzerland, in a building designed by Steiner. The nonproselytizing society is noted for its schools.

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