Yes, I Would...: An American Woman's Letters to Turkey

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Blue Dome Press, Aug 16, 2010 - Travel - 320 pages
Yes, I Would... comprises a series of imaginary letters written to Lady Mary Montagu, whose famous Embassy Letters were written in 1716-1718 during her stay in Turkey as the wife of the English ambassador. The author uses themes dear to Lady Mary, such as culture, art, religion, women and daily life, to reflect on those same topics as encountered during the author's past 30 years of travel in Turkey.
 

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Beautiful book. I would recommend to anyone who likes travel stories and who is interested in learning about other cultures by traveling and living in those countries. Although the letter is written as imaginary letters to Lady Mary Montagu, an ambassador's wife who loved traveling and writing in 18.cc, it is Katherine Branning's imaginary comparison with the Lady's experiences and herself. It is about her many travels to Turkey after she studied in France and how she came to respect the people and their friendship while examining customs, socio-culture, history, and art, among other traits.  

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Contents

Section 18
Section 19
Section 20
Section 21
Section 22
Section 23
Section 24
Section 25

Section 9
Section 10
Section 11
Section 12
Section 13
Section 14
Section 15
Section 16
Section 17
Section 26
Section 27
Section 28
Section 29
Section 30
Section 31
Section 32
Section 33
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Katharine Branning, MLS, is Vice-President of the French Institute Alliance Francaise in New York City, where she serves as the Director of FIAF's Library. In recognition of her work involved in the creation of over 8 libraries in both France and the United States, in 2006 she was awarded the Ordre National du Merite by the President of France, one of the nation's highest honors. Ms. Branning is a graduate of the Ecole du Louvre in Paris, where she majored in Islamic arts, with a specialty in Islamic glass.

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