Nuclear Proliferation and Terrorism in the Post-9/11 World

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Springer, Mar 29, 2016 - Science - 434 pages

This book fills a clear gap in the literature for a technically-focused book covering nuclear proliferation and related issues post-9/11. Using a concept-led approach which serves a broad readership, it provides detailed overview of nuclear weapons, nuclear proliferation and international nuclear policy. The author addresses topics including offensive and defensive missile systems, command and control, verification, weapon effects, and nuclear testing. A chronology of nuclear arms is presented including detailed discussion of the Cold War, proliferation, and arms control treaties.

The book is tailored to courses on nuclear proliferation, and the general reader will also find it a fascinating introduction to the science and strategy behind international nuclear policy in the modern era.


 

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Contents

1 History of the Nuclear Age
1
2 Nuclear Weapons
41
3 Nuclear Reactors and Radiation
71
4 Missiles and War Games
95
5 Ballistic Missile Defense
120
6 Verification and Arms Control Treaties
137
7 Winding Down the Cold War
155
8 Nuclear Proliferation
180
12 Terrorism
270
13 Nuclear Terrorism
291
14 Cyber Terrorism
309
15 Biological and Chemical Weapons
337
16 Conclusions
353
Appendix A Reflections on Nuclear Arms Control
376
Appendix B Reflections on Nuclear Proliferation
405
Appendix C Websites
419

9 Proliferation Technologies
201
10 Proliferated States
223
11 Nuclear Testing and the NPT
253
Glossary
423
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About the author (2016)

David Hafemeister is Professor (emeritus) of Physics at Cal Poly University. He was employed on national security matters by Senator John Glenn (1975-77), State Department (Special Assistant to Under Sec. of State on nuclear proliferation, 1977-79, 1987), Senate Committees on Foreign Relations (1990-92) and Governmental Affairs (1992-93), Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (1997), Study Director at the National Academy of Sciences (2000–2) and Stanford University Center for International Security and Cooperation (2005-06). He was the lead SFRC technical staff on the ratification of TTBT, CFE and START. His book, Physics of Societal Issues (Springer, 2007) attempts to quantify what is quantifiable. He was chair of the Los Alamos Nonproliferation-Division Review Committee (2003-06).