The Politics and Perils of Space Exploration: Who Will Compete, Who Will Dominate?

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Springer, Nov 22, 2016 - Technology & Engineering - 199 pages
Written by a former Aerodynamics Officer on the space shuttle program, this book provides a complete overview of the “new” U. S. space program, which has changed considerably over the past 50 years.The future of space exploration has become increasingly dependent on other countries and private enterprise.
Can private enterprise fill NASA's shoes and provide the same expertise, safety measures and lessons learned?
In order to tell this story, it is important to understand the politics of space as well as the dangers, why it is so difficult to explore and utilize the resources of space. Some past and recent triumphs and failures will be discussed, pointing the way to a successful space policy that includes taking risks but also learning how to mitigate them.
 

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Contents

The New Space Race
1
The Commercial Space Race
25
Mars
41
Why Not Go Back to the Moon?
71
The Science and Dangers of Outer Space
81
Politics and the Space Race
107
The PostApollo and Space Shuttle Era
127
Politics the ISS and Private Enterprise
153
Technological Risks and Accidents
162
New Technology and Deep Space
179
Index
195
Copyright

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About the author (2016)

Linda Dawson received her BS in Engineering Aeronautics and Astronautics from MIT and a Engineering Aeronautics and Astronautics MS from George Washington University at NASA Langley Research Center. She is a Senior Lecturer in Physical Science and Statistics at the University of Washington, Tacoma. Dawson served as Aerodynamics Officer for the Mission Control Center Ascent and Entry Flight Control Teams during the first space shuttle mission. During orbital phases, she served as an advisor on the impact of system failures on the orbiter's re-entry trajectory and configuration. From re-entry through touchdown, she was responsible for monitoring the orbiter's stability and control, advising the crew of any necessary corrective actions. Additionally, she serves on the Education Committee and the Space Committee for the Museum of Flight in Seattle.

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