Quantum Physics in the Nanoworld: Schrödinger's Cat and the Dwarfs

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Springer Science & Business Media, Oct 23, 2012 - Science - 466 pages
The book deals with all essential aspects of non-relativistic quantum physics up to the quantization of fields. In contrast to common textbooks of quantum mechanics, modern experiments are described both for the purpose of foundation of the theory and in relation to recent applications. In this respect applications to nano-electronics as well as the realization of quantum-bits are presented and discussed. Furthermore, links are made to other important research fields and applications, such as elementary particle physics, solid state physics and nuclear magnetic resonance tomography in medicine. Even though the representation of the topics is largely performed in terms of Dirac ́s bra-ket notation and by use of commutator algebra, the concrete description of the physical basis and the corresponding theoretical concepts are emphasized. Because of little requirement of complex mathematics, the book is suitable as an introduction into quantum physics, not only for physicists but also for chemists, biologists, engineers, computer scientists and even for philosophers as far as they are interested in natural philosophy and epistomology.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Some Fundamental Experiments
9
ParticleWave Duality
27
Quantum States in Hilbert Space
79
Angular Momentum Spin and Particle Categories
119
Approximate Solutions for Important Model Systems
201
Superposition Entanglement and Other Oddities
291
Fields and Quanta
341
Synopsis
429
Interfaces and Heterostructures
433
Preparation of Semiconductor Nanostructures
439
The Reduced Density Matrix
448
Problems
453
Index
463
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Hans Lüth was born in Aachen, Germany, in 1940. He received the diploma in physics in 1965 and the doctoral degree (PhD) in physics in 1968, both from the Aachen University of Technology (RWTH). Between 1974 and 1986 he held several guest scientist and visiting professor positions at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Centre (USA), the Universities of Paris (F), Aix-Marseille (F) and Modena (I). Since 1980 he is professor for physics and since 2000 simultaneously professor for electrical engineering at the RWTH Aachen. Additionally, in 1988 he became the director of the Institute of Bio- and Nanosystems (now Peter Grünberg Institut, PGI 9) at the Research Centre Jülich, Germany. Between 2006 and 2007 he was Research Director for Key Technologies at the Research Centre Jülich. For his scientific work and for his globally used text books he was awarded the Doctor Honoris Causa by the Universite de Haute-Alsace, Mulhouse-Colmar (F). His research interests center around semiconductor interface physics and quantum electronics.

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