A Brief History of String Theory: From Dual Models to M-Theory

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Springer Science & Business Media, Feb 18, 2014 - Science - 251 pages

During its forty year lifespan, string theory has always had the power to divide, being called both a 'theory of everything' and a 'theory of nothing'. Critics have even questioned whether it qualifies as a scientific theory at all. This book adopts an objective stance, standing back from the question of the truth or falsity of string theory and instead focusing on how it came to be and how it came to occupy its present position in physics. An unexpectedly rich history is revealed, with deep connections to our most well-established physical theories. Fully self-contained and written in a lively fashion, the book will appeal to a wide variety of readers from novice to specialist.

 

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Contents

1 History and Mythology
1
19591973
19
2 Particle Physics in the Sixties
20
3 The Veneziano Model
51
4 The Hadronic String
71
5 Supersymmetric Strings and Field Theoretic Limits
97
19741984
110
6 An Early Demise?
113
8 Turning Points
147
19851995
167
9 Superstring Theory and the Real World
168
10 A Second Superstring Revolution and the Future of String Theory
207
Particle Physics in the Sixties
243
Index
243
Titles in This Series
249
Copyright

7 Theoretical Exaptation in String Theory
133

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About the author (2014)

Dean Rickles is associate professor of history and philosophy of science at the University of Sydney. He specialises in the history and philosophy of quantum gravity and has published extensively in this area. He has authored or edited several books including: The Structural Foundations of Quantum Gravity (coedited with S. French and J. Saatsi: Oxford University Press, 2006); Symmetry, Structure, and Spacetime (Elsevier, 2007); The Ashgate Companion to Contemporary Philosophy of Physics (Ashgate, 2008); and The Role of Gravitation in Physics: Report from the 1957 Chapel Hill Conference (Co-edited with Cecile DeWitt: Max Planck Research Library for the History and Development of Knowledge, 2011).

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