Quantum (Un)speakables: From Bell to Quantum Information

Front Cover
R.A. Bertlmann, A. Zeilinger
Springer Science & Business Media, Nov 11, 2013 - Technology & Engineering - 485 pages
issues raised by quantum theory, a topic not very popular during his student days at Queen's University, Belfast. Apparently, John Bell, who had been interested in the Bohr-Einstein dialogue, always took the position of Albert Einstein on philosophical issues. He also felt that a completion of quantum mechanics using so-called "hidden variables" would be highly desired, as it would help to regain a realistic and objective picture of the world. That way, Bell hoped one would be able to arrive at a physics where "measurement" would not play such a central role as in the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics. Then, a most interesting sequence of events set in. In 1952, David Bohm had achieved something which had earlier been proclaimed impossible. It had been proved by John von Neumann that no hidden variable theory could agree with quantum mechanics. Bohm actually formulated such a theory, where each particle at any time has both a well-defined position and a well defined momentum. The conflict raised between von Neumann and Bohm was elegantly resolved by Bell, who showed that von Neumann's proof contained a physically unjustifiable assumption. So while John Bell had flung open the door widely for hidden variable theories, he immediately dealt them a major blow. In 1964, in his celebrated paper "On the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Paradox", he showed that any hidden variable theory, which obeys Einstein's requirement of locality, i. e.
 

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Contents

Some Reminiscences
4
My Interaction with John Bell
21
Reinhold A Bertlmann
29
Some Reminiscences and Reflections
49
Early History of Bells Theorem
61
On Four Decades of Interaction with John Bell
99
The Naive View of an Experimentalist
119
Bells Theorem for SpaceLike Separation
154
The Geometry of the Quantum Paradoxes
257
Whose Knowledge?
270
The History of the GHZ Paper
281
John Stewart Bell
287
How Does God Play Dice?
307
John Bell State Reduction and Quanglement
318
Conclusion
349
John Bells Observations on the Chiral Anomaly
377

The EPR Paradox in Massive Systems
163
Are There Measurements?
183
Sundays in a Quantum Engineers Life
199
Secret Sides of Bells Theorem
209
MultiPhoton Entanglement and Quantum NonLocality
224
Bells Theorem Information and Quantum Physics
241
Thermal Excitations of Accelerated Electrons
400
Aberration
419
Geneva Switzerland
440
Subject Index
479
Copyright

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