The Discovery of Anti-matter: The Autobiography of Carl David Anderson, the Youngest Man to Win the Nobel Prize

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World Scientific, 1999 - Science - 144 pages
In 1936, at age 31, Carl David Anderson became the second youngest Nobel laureate for his discovery of antimatter when he observed positrons in a cloud chamber.He is responsible for developing rocket power weapons that were used in World War II.He was born in New York City in 1905 and was educated in Los Angeles. He served for many years as a physics professor at California Institute of Technology. Prior to Oppenheimer, Anderson was offered the job of heading the Los Alamos atomic bomb program but could not assume the role because of family obligations.He was a pioneer in studying cosmic rays at high altitudes, first atop Pike's Peak, then after the war in a specially equipped B-29.
 

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Since the SAM will be launched into space for the first time to study/discover new science with Cosmic Rays and Antimatter today, April 29th, 2011, this book is a very creative and wittingly fun read to catch up or introduce one's self into the concept of Antimatter.
A very quick read, and an inspiring guide to all engineers/scientists students as well as professionals who want to get away from their boring industries or jobs and pursue more interesting challenges of the universe.
 

Contents

EARLY YEARS AS A CURIOUS CHILD
1
GRADUATE STUDENT DAYS AT CALTECH
15
THE DISCOVERY OF THE POSITRON WITH
23
The Announcement of the Positron
34
ANTIMATTER
38
RESEARCH IN THE TROPICS
61
RETURN TO CALTECH AND THE DISCOVERY
70
THE NOBEL PRIZE
80
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