The Fables of Aesop

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D. Nutt, 1889 - Aesop's fables
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User Review  - HillaryBertucci - LibraryThing

I really loved this book, it was so much better than I expected. This book is full of old fables that the author has brought back with new twist. My favorite version that the author includes is "The ... Read full review

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User Review  - AbigailAdams26 - LibraryThing

Fables from Aesop by Tom Lynch Illustrated with bright, fabric-collage art, this collection presents thirteen classic fables that are commonly attributed to Aesop. The front dust-jacket flap maintains ... Read full review

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Page 86 - For the body is not one member, but many. If the foot shall say, Because I am not the hand, I am not of the body; is it therefore not of the body?
Page 86 - God set the members every one of them in the body, as it hath pleased him. And if they were all one member, where were the body? But now are they many members, yet but one body. And the eye cannot say unto the hand, I have no need of thee: nor again the head to the feet, I have no need of you.
Page 86 - I am not of the body; is it therefore not of the body? And if the ear shall say, Because I am not the eye, I am not of the body; it is therefore not of the body?
Page 87 - Nay, much more those members of the body, which seem to be more feeble, are necessary : and those members of the body which we think to be less honourable, upon these we bestow more abundant honour ; and our.
Page 86 - And the eye cannot say unto the hand, I have no need of thee: nor again the head to the feet, I have no need of you. Nay, much more those members of the body, which seem to be more feeble, are necessary...
Page 133 - There be three things which are too wonderful for me, yea, four which I know not: The way of an eagle in the air ; the way of a serpent upon a rock ; the way of a ship in the midst of the sea ; and the way of a man with a maid.
Page 132 - Who hath ascended up into heaven, or descended ? who hath gathered the wind in his fists ? who hath bound the waters in a garment? who hath established all the ends of the earth ? what is his name, and what is his son's name, if thou canst tell ? 5 Every word of God is pure : he is a shield unto them that put their trust in him.
Page ix - He sat among the woods, he heard The sylvan merriment: he saw The pranks of butterfly and bird, The humours of the ape, the daw. And in the lion or the frog — In all the life of moor and fen, In ass and peacock, stork and dog, He read similitudes of men. 'Of these, from those,' he cried, 'we come, Our hearts, our, brains descend from these.
Page 127 - Twas thine own genius gave the final blow, And help'd to plant the wound that laid thee low : So the struck eagle, stretch'd upon the plain, No more through rolling clouds to soar again, View'd his own feather on the fatal dart, And wing'd the shaft that quiver'd in his heart; Keen were his pangs, but keener far to feel He nursed the pinion which impell'd the steel ; While the same plumage that had warm'd his nest Drank the last life-drop of his bleeding breast.
Page 87 - God tempered the body together, giving more abundant honour to that part which lacked ; that there should be no schism in the body ; but that the members should have the same care one for another. And whether one member suffereth, all the members suffer with it ; or one member is honoured, all the members rejoice with it.

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