Life of General Sir Robert Wilson ...: From Autobiographical Memoirs, Journals, Narratives, Correspondence, &c, Volume 1

Front Cover
J. Murray, 1862 - Generals
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 242 - Corporal punishments never yet reformed a corps; but they have totally ruined many a man who would have proved, under milder treatment, a meritorious soldier. They break the spirit, without amending the disposition...
Page 67 - being again , given, although we could ill spare the detachment, a small body of iussars was ordered to move on the wood, as Otto suspected that there was a corps of the enemy concealed in it. His suspicion was quickly verified. ' When we began to trot the French cavalry made a movement to right and left from the centre, dashed in a gallop — towards wood and village, and at the same moment we saw in lieu of them, as if created by magic, an equal...
Page 70 - ... •was frantic in his gestures and exclamations of joy on the return of his forlorn hope. He had given them up for lost. He had even made the Duke of York acquainted with his despair. Speaking of the achievement after an interval of many years, Sir Robert Wilson declares his conviction that it was the most daring in conception, the most resolute in execution, and the most unaccountable in its success that ever came within the range of his experience.
Page 10 - Bath, 1746. [Ее. 2. 29.] Another Copy. 8vo. Bath, 1746. [P. 2. 30.] WILSON (Benj.) Essay towards an Explication of the Phenomena of Electricity, deduced from the ./Ether of Sir Isaac Newton.
Page 247 - ... department. He offered his services to Lord Mulgrave, who was talked of for the Lord Lieutenancy of Ireland, and he also applied to Count Woronzow with the view of taking service in the Russian army. This period of uncertainty was at length closed by his being allowed to purchase a Lieutenant-Colonelcy in the 19th Light Dragoons, and to exchange into the 20th, which formed part of an expedition under the command of Sir David Baird, whom he joined at Cork on the 27th of August, 1805. The principal...
Page 68 - But happily the heads kept their direction, and the heels were duly applied to the " charge," which order was hailed with repeated huzzas. ' The guns were quickly taken, but we then found that the chaussee, which ran through a hollow with steep banks, lay between them and the infantry. There was, however, no hesitation : every horse was true to his master, and the chausse'e was passed in uninterrupted impetuous career. It was then, as we gained the crest, that the infantry poured its volley — but...
Page 62 - It was divided, he ays, into eight columns; and his regiment, the 15th of Light Horse, formed part of one commanded by Sir William Erskine. His first encounter with the enemy was not attended, as it seems, with much personal danger, or any brilliant result:— ''Too much time,' he remarks, ' was lost in making the disposition; and when the French cavalry, who showed good countenance to the last, retired, there was an apprehension that the wood was ambuscaded ; so that the operation was not accomplished...
Page 293 - The wind blew a very heavy gale, so that no boats could reach the usual place of debarkation, four miles distant, and I was ordered to land in the open bay. At three o'clock the signal was elevated for casting off from the ships, and I in a man-of-war's boat, with Newland in her, and towing our longboat with ten horses, bore up for the shore. Expert management was required, as the gusts were hurricanes, and I could not help feeling again that the elements were not in unison with my fortune; so much...
Page 68 - Our squadrons, still on the gallop, closed to fill up the gaps which the French fire and bayonets had occasioned, and proceeded to the attack on the French cavalry, , which, though it had suffered from the fire of part of its own infantry, seemed resolved to await the onset ; but their discipline or their courage failed, and our horses' heads drove on them just as they were on the half-turn to retire.
Page 66 - ... from view. This error continued until the 15th and Leopold were within half cannon-shot, when we were unable to perceive a vestige of them. ' At this period General Otto, who had moved on with the advance, received advice that the Emperor, who was on his road to Cateau, was intercepted by the enemy in front, and must infallibly be taken unless they were obliged to throw back their left. Otto immediately halted our advancing line, and calling together the commanders, told them the perilous situation...

Bibliographic information