Pattern-making

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Popular mechanics Company, 1910 - Patternmaking - 203 pages
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Page 222 - Written so you can understand it " by a man well qualified because he has made a thorough study of all obtainable information on the subject. He has tried out the different methods himself and herein he sets forth the best practice. Concise, yet complete, this book is adapted to use as a text in manual training and industrial schools and will be found a practical working manual both by those who desire to spin metal as an art recreation and those who wish to follow this work as a trade. Explicit...
Page 219 - Articles describing how to produce the different finishes and showing methods of making joints and bending wood. "Written So You Can Understand It" May be ordered of any newsdealer in the US or will be sent to any address postpaid upon receipt of the price, 25 cents, by the publishers. 128 Pages, Cloth Cover...
Page 217 - Power Gas and the Gas Producer By JC MILLER, ME An Authentic Text Book and a Complete Reference Manual Covering Every Detail of Installation and Operation The new method of adapting the latent power in coal to man's best use is still a mystery even to the well informed, because nearly all the literature on the subject has been written under the assumption that the reader knows as much about the subject as the writer. A comprehensive treatise, clear of abstruse technicalities, in every way authentic,...
Page 218 - ... Complete dimensioned working drawings, explicit instructions how to make, and half-tone illustrations of the finished pieces. Special Features Are: Articles describing how to produce the different finishes and showing methods of making joints and bending wood. "Written So You Can Understand It...
Page 14 - ... need to be made as perfect as others, as only one casting may be required. In a case of this kind the patternmaker adopts the quickest and cheapest construction possible. The making of all tools and devices in cast metals necessitates the previous making of a pattern. At the present time not only cast metals require a pattern but frequently stone, brick, mortar, cement, plaster of Paris, rubber, glass, paper — in fact, almost everything that is made in odd shapes requires a pattern. Some men...
Page 185 - ... other materials, by means of patterns. The patterns are generally made of wood and are exactly the size and shape of the desired castings. In many plants the pattern for any small casting to be made in considerable numbers is mounted on a thin plate in such a manner that one-half of the pattern is on one side of the plate and the other half on the other side. The plate with its pattern is inserted between the two halves of the molding box, called a flask, and the molding material is tightly packed...
Page 14 - Some pattern-makers spend nearly as much time trying to picture in their minds how the casting should look when taken out of the sand as they do in working at the pattern, while if they had a good knowledge of drawing much of this time would be saved. From the...
Page 218 - PART I THIS is the first of a series of twenty-five cent handbooks on industrial subjects to be issued from time to time by POPULAR MECHANICS. This book consists of a number of articles telling how to make a large assortment of pieces of mission furniture. It is fully illustrated and the directions are accompanied by dimensioned working drawings. Like POPULAR MECHANICS, it is in plain, simple language and "Written so you can understand it," so that anyone possessing a slight knowledge of how to use...
Page 215 - It is the marvelous story of the achievements of expert Electricians, Engineers, Chemists, Mechanics and the men who are re-discovering the Lost Arts. It is the wonderful story of the Progress of this Mechanical Age, Stranger...
Page 215 - ... from Melting Icebergs? And Power from the Sun? These things are already being done, but the possibilities of development are as yet undreamed. Would you know of these things; of the daily discoveries of great men; of the progress of electricity and gas and steam on land and sea and in the air? All these and a thousand other subjects are made plain; are told in simple, truthful language, devoid of technical terms, and "written to you can understand it," with hundreds of illustrations each month,...

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