Memoirs of British generals distinguished during the Peninsular war

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1856
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Page iii - How sleep the brave, who sink to rest, By all their country's wishes blest ! When Spring, with dewy fingers cold, Returns to deck their hallowed mould, She there shall dress a sweeter sod Than Fancy's feet have ever trod.
Page 315 - ... carried our Arapiles, or he would have confined us entirely to our position. This was not to be endured, and we fell upon him, turning his left flank ; and I never saw an army receive such a beating.
Page 53 - Thus ended the career of sir John Moore, a man whose uncommon capacity was sustained by the purest virtue, and governed by a disinterested patriotism more. in keeping with the primitive than the luxurious age of a great nation.
Page 56 - Wolfe, his last moments were gilded by the prospect of success, and cheered by the acclamations of victory ; like Wolfe, also, his memory will for ever remain sacred in that country which he sincerely loved, and which he had so faithfully served.
Page 57 - In the school of regimental duty he obtained that correct knowledge of his profession so essential to the proper direction of the gallant spirit of the soldier ; and he was enabled to establish a characteristic order and regularity of conduct, because the troops found in their leader a striking example of the discipline which he enforced on others. Having risen to command, he signalized his name in the West Indies, in Holland, and in Egypt.
Page 58 - During the season of repose, his time was devoted to the care and instruction of the officer and soldier; in war, he courted service in every quarter of the globe. Regardless of personal considerations, he esteemed that to which his country called him, the post of honour ; and by his undaunted spirit, and unconquerable perseverance, he pointed the way to victory. " His country, the object of his latest solicitude...
Page 221 - THERE is a tear for all that die, A mourner o'er the humblest grave ; But nations swell the funeral cry, And Triumph weeps above the brave. For them is Sorrow's purest sigh O'er Ocean's heaving bosom sent : In vain their bones unburied lie, All earth becomes their monument ! A tomb is theirs on every page, An epitaph on every tongue : The present hours, the future age, For them bewail, to them belong.
Page 134 - Guards carried all before them, and whilst I exculpate my own regiment, I am delighted in being able to bear testimony to the gallant conduct of the former. Be not uneasy, my brother officers ; you had ample opportunity, of which you gallantly availed yourselves, of avenging yourselves on the 18th for the failure on the 17th ; and after all, what regiment, or which of us, is certain of success ? " Be assured that I am proud of being your Colonel, and that you possess my utmost confidence. " Your...
Page 204 - ... rout. He retired after the battle to the ground he had been previously on, but occupying it in position ; and on this morning, or rather during the night, commenced his retreat on the road he came, towards Seville, and has abandoned Badajoz to its fate.
Page 56 - ... arduous retreat with consummate firmness, he has terminated a career of distinguished honour. by a death that has given the enemy additional f 2 reason to respect the name of a British Soldier.

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