Morrison's Strangers' Guide to the City of Washington, and Its Vicinity ...

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W. M. Morrison, 1844 - Washington (D.C.) - 108 pages
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Page 63 - I regard Mr. Greenough's Washington as one of the greatest works of sculpture of modern times. I do not know the work which can justly be preferred to it, whether we consider the purity of the taste, the loftiness of the conception, the truth of the character, or, •what we must own we feel less able to judge of, accuracy of anatomical study and mechanical skill.
Page 105 - ... shall forfeit and pay the sum of five dollars for each and every passenger on board of...
Page 18 - Ionic columns, with capitals, after those of the temple of Minerva Polias, support a gallery to the east, and form a loggia below — and a new gallery of iron pillars and railings of a light and elegant structure, projects from the circular walls — the dome ceiling is enriched with square caissons of stucco. The walls are covered with straw coloured drapery, between small pilasters of marble in the wall.
Page 13 - Corinthian elevation of pilasters and columns — the columns thirty feet in height, form a noble advancing portico, on the east, one hundred and sixty feet in extent — the centre of which is crowned with a pediment of eighty feet span : a receding loggia of one hundred feet extent, distinguishes the centre of the west front.
Page 9 - Provided nevertheless, That the operation of the laws of the state within such district shall not be affected by this acceptance, until the time fixed for the removal of the government thereto, and until Congress shall otherwise by law provide.
Page 8 - That a district of territory not exceeding ten miles square, to be located as hereafter directed, on the River Potomac, at some space between the mouths of the Eastern Branch and Conococheague, be, and the same is hereby accepted for the permanent Seat of the Government of the United States...
Page 32 - ... green, yellow, white and blue papers, sprinkled with gold stars and with gilt borders. The stairs, for family use, are in a cross entry at this end, with store rooms, china closets, &c., between the two dining rooms. On the east end of the house is the large...
Page 85 - Alexandria ; and tradition still pomts to the site on which now stands the older Episcopal Church, (but then " in the woods,") as the spot where he pitched his tents, while the road over the western hills, by which his army withdrew, long bore the name of this unfortunate commander. But the reminiscences which the Alexandrians most cherish are those which associate their town with the domestic attachments and habits of Washington. The reader of his letters and addresses will remember that he constantly...
Page 13 - The exterior of this edifice presents a rusticated basement of the height of the first story ; the two other stories are comprised in a Corinthian elevation of pilasters and columns. The columns are thirty feet in height, and compose a portico on the eastern front of one hundred and sixty feet in extent, the centre of which is crowned...
Page 9 - That a district of territory, not exceeding ten miles square, to be located as hereafter directed on the river Potomac, at some place between the mouths of the Eastern Branch and Connogochegue, be, and the same is hereby accepted for the permanent seat of the government of the United States.

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