Curiosities of History: Boston, September Seventeenth, 1630-1880

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Lee and Shepard, 1880 - Boston (Mass.) - 129 pages
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Page 79 - ... danger to undergo the like, we have thought fit to signify our pleasure in that behalf for the future ; and do hereby require, that if there be any of those people called Quakers amongst you, now already condemned to suffer death or other corporal punishment, or that are imprisoned, and obnoxious to the like condemnation, you are to forbear to proceed any further therein...
Page 97 - To be sold by the Printer of this paper, the very best Negro Woman in this Town, who has had the small pox and the measles ; is as hearty as a Horse, as brisk as a Bird, and will work like a Beaver.
Page 99 - tis not my design to lay the scene of my discourse as far off as Bethcar, the place w-here Samuel set up his Ebenezer. I am immediately to transfer it into the heart of Boston, a place where the remarkable help received from Heaven by the people, does loudly call for an Ebenezer. And I do not ask you to change the name of the town into that of Helpstone, as there is a town in England of that name, which may seem the English of Ebenezer; but my Sermon shall be this day, your Ebenezer, if you will...
Page 78 - TRUSTY and well beloved, we greet you well. Having been informed that several of our subjects amongst you, called Quakers, have been and are imprisoned by you, whereof some have been executed, and others, as hath been represented unto us, are in danger to undergo the like, we have thought fit to signify our pleasure in that behalf for the future ; and do hereby require, that if there be any of those people called Quakers amongst you, now already condemned to suffer death or other corporal punishment,...
Page 110 - GEORGE the Third, by the grace of GOD of Great-Britain, France and Ireland King, defender of the faith, and so forth; and in the year of our LORD one thousand seven hundred and eighty-eight.
Page 46 - ... and incite the natives of [the] country to the knowledge and obedience of the only true God and Saviour of mankind, and the Christian faith, which in our royal intention, and the adventurers' free profession, is the principal end of this plantation.
Page 79 - England, together with the respective crimes or offences laid to their charge: to the end such course may be taken with them here, as shall be agreeable to our laws and their demerits. And for so doing, these our letters shall be your sufficient warrant and discharge. Given at our Court at Whitehall, the 9th day of September, 1661, in the thirteenth year of our reign.
Page 133 - It was not accounted a strange thing in those days to drink water, and to eat samp or hominy without butter or milk. Indeed, it would have been a strange thing to see a piece of roast beef, mutton, or veal ; though it was not long before there was roast goat.
Page 17 - In the Chief, or high Street, there are stately Edifices, some of which have cost the owners two or three Thousand Pounds the raising ; which, I think, plainly proves Two old Adages true, viz. That a Fool and his Money is soon parted . and, set a Beggar on Horse-back he' II Ride to the Devil ; for the Fathers of these Men were Tinkers and Peddlers.
Page 78 - Quakers, have been, and are imprisoned by you, whereof some of them have been executed, and others, (as hath been represented unto us,) are in danger to undergo the like ; we have thought fit to signify our pleasure in that behalf, for the future ; and do hereby require that if there be any of those...

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