Flowers and Flower Lore, Volume 1

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W.S. Sonnenschein and Company, 1884 - Flowers - 16 pages
 

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Page 216 - They that sow in tears shall reap in joy. He that goeth forth and weepeth, bearing precious seed, shall doubtless come again with rejoicing, bringing his sheaves with him.
Page 85 - When shepherds pipe on oaten straws, And merry larks are ploughmen's clocks, When turtles tread, and rooks, and daws, And maidens bleach their summer smocks, The cuckoo then, on every tree, Mocks married men ; for thus sings he. Cuckoo...
Page 199 - Where falls not hail, or rain, or any snow. Nor ever wind blows loudly; but it lies Deep-meadow'd, happy, fair with orchard lawns And bowery hollows crown'd with summer sea, Where I will heal me of my grievous wound.
Page 20 - When he comes back ; you demi-puppets that By moonshine do the green sour ringlets make, Whereof the ewe not bites, and you whose pastime Is to make midnight mushrooms, that rejoice To hear the solemn curfew...
Page 159 - Fair ferns and flowers, and chiefly that tall fern, So stately, of the Queen Osmunda named ; Plant lovelier, in its own retired abode On Grasmere's beach, than Naiad by the side Of Grecian brook, or Lady of the Mere, Sole-sitting by the shores of old romance.
Page 215 - Harry, I do not only marvel where thou spendest thy time, but also how thou art accompanied : for though the camomile, the more it is trodden on, the faster it grows, yet youth, the more it is wasted, the sooner it wears.
Page 251 - DAFFODILS Fair daffodils, we weep to see You haste away so soon; As yet the early-rising sun Has not attained his noon. Stay, stay, Until the hasting day Has run But to the even-song; And, having prayed together, we Will go with you along.
Page 155 - Her lips were red, and one was thin ; Compared to that was next her chin, Some bee had stung it newly ; But Dick, her eyes so guard her face, I durst no more upon them gaze, Than on the sun in July.
Page 85 - Cuckoo; Cuckoo, cuckoo: O word of fear, Unpleasing to a married ear! When shepherds pipe on oaten straws And merry larks are ploughmen's clocks, When turtles tread, and rooks, and daws, And maidens bleach their summer smocks The cuckoo then, on every tree, Mocks married men; for thus sings he, Cuckoo; Cuckoo, cuckoo: O word of fear, Unpleasing to a married ear!
Page 191 - Gethsemane, because it is said to have been growing at the foot of the cross, and to have received on its leaves some of the blood :— ' Those deep unwrought marks. The villager will tell you, Are the flower's portion from the atoning blood On Calvary shed. Beneath the Cross it grew.

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