Memoirs of the War in Spain, from 1808 to 1814, Volume 1

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H. Colburn, 1829 - Peninsular War, 1807-1814
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Page 308 - Zenobia of our histories) built two fortresses, one on the right the other on the left bank of the Euphrates, and connected them by a tunnel, which she made by damming and turning the Euphrates when its waters were low, executing a deep cutting in its bed, bricking the cutting over, and then turning the waters back again.
Page 207 - Barcelona might be lost ; and there can be no doubt that the enemy will try every means of intercepting it. My presence alone can insure its safety ; and you are well aware that even were the chances equal we could not expose ourselves to this hazard, which if it happened to be against us would be without remedy.
Page 127 - ... came from a family well known in the military annals of France, and was born at Versailles on Feb. 13, 1811. He went through a course of study in the Ecole Polytechnique, entered the army in 1831, and in the following year served in Africa. In 1836 he was advanced to the grade of lieutenant, having won the Cross of the Legion of Honour on the field of battle. In 1837 he accompanied the Foreign Legion into Spain, and after two vigorous campaigns against the Carlists he returned to Algeria in 1839...
Page 78 - In other respects, the presence of a disciplined army, and the organization of a regular system of internal administration had considerably improved the condition of the province. The inhabitants gradually resumed their peaceful occupations, and appeared to yield ready compliance to our wishes.
Page 21 - Spaniards by nearly five leagues, when the 1st division, which formed the advance, was seized with a sudden panic. The terrified soldiers fancied that the enemy was close at their heels. The alarm rapidly spread under favour of the darkness ; they tired upon each other and took to flight in the utmost confusion.
Page 52 - Guerilla for the purpose of protecting its territory and co-operating in the common defence. Peasants, land owners, fathers of families, priests and monks, unhesitatingly abandoned their dwellings in...
Page liii - He was tall in stature, with a dignified though mild countenance ; his eyes were indicative of the utmost kindness of disposition, and his physiognomy expressed the sentiments of benevolence with which his heart overflowed.
Page 329 - I have nothing to say concerning the plans and counscle of my superiors, which led to the Convention of Cintra, and the evacuation of Portugal by the French.
Page 82 - ... it may be said, in short, that the authority of the governor of Navarre did not extend beyond the glacis of his capital.
Page 94 - It is an undeniable truth that in time of war, more than under any .other circumstance, a knowledge of the existing state of things is so indispensably requisite, that without such knowledge, it is utterly impossible to fix the moment of acting...

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