Historical Sketches of the Missions of the United Brethren: For Propagating the Gospel Among the Heathen, from Their Commencement to the Present Time

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R. Napper, and sold by Dugdale, Keene, Milliken, Archer, 1818 - Missions - 472 pages
 

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Page 336 - As I live, saith the Lord, I have no pleasure in the death of the wicked; but that the wicked turn from his way and live, turn ye, turn ye, from your evil ways; for why will ye die?
Page 422 - Fear not : for I am with thee : I will bring thy seed from the east, and gather thee from the west; I will say to the north, Give up; and to the south, Keep not back: bring my sons from far, and my daughters from the ends of the earth...
Page 74 - They which builded on the wall, and they that bare burdens, with those that laded, every one with one of his hands wrought in the work, and with the other hand held a weapon.
Page 229 - An altar of earth thou shalt make unto me, and shalt sacrifice thereon thy burnt offerings, and thy peace offerings, thy sheep, and thine oxen : in all places where I record my name I will come unto thee, and I will bless thee.
Page 371 - He sent redemption unto his people : he hath commanded his covenant for ever : holy and reverend is his name.
Page 330 - Remember therefore from whence thou art fallen, and repent, and do the first works ; or else I will come unto thee quickly, and will remove thy candlestick out of his place, except thou repent.
Page 127 - But he is unconcerned ; — this cannot be a bad man ; he fears no evil, not even from us, who are so savage : but sleeps comfortably, and places his life in our hands...
Page 82 - ... waves. The sight was tremendous, and awfully grand — the large fields of ice, raising themselves out of the water, striking against each other, and plunging into the deep with a violence not to be described, and a noise like the discharge of innumerable batteries of heavy guns. The darkness of the night, the roaring of the wind and sea, and the dashing of the waves and ice against the rocks, filled the travellers with sensations of awe and horror, as almost to deprive them of the power of utterance.
Page 81 - Noises were now likewise distinctly heard in many directions, like the report of cannon, owing to the bursting of the ice at some distance. The Esquimaux therefore drove with all haste towards the shore, intending to take up their night-quarters on the south side of the Nivak.
Page 86 - On the 17th, the wind had considerably increased with heavy showers of snow and sleet, but they set off at half-past ten o'clock in the forenoon. Mark ran all the way round Kiglapeit before the sledge to find a good track, and about one o'clock, through God's mercy, they were out of danger and reached the bay. Here they found a good track, upon smooth ice, made a meal of the remnant of their provisions, and got some warm coffee.

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