Guns and Cavalry: Their Performances in the Past and Their Prospects in the Future

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Roberts, 1896 - Artillery - 220 pages
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Page 64 - Hussars, saw the danger, and rode his few men straight ut them, cutting his way through with fearful loss. The other regiments turned, and engaged in a desperate encounter. With courage too great almost for credence, they were breaking their way through the columns...
Page 65 - The other regiments turned and engaged in a desperate encounter. With courage too great almost for credence, they were breaking their way through the columns which enveloped them, when there took place an act of atrocity without parallel in the modern warfare of civilized nations. The Russian gunners, when the storm of cavalry passed, returned to their guns. They saw their own cavalry mingled with the troopers who had just ridden over them, and, to the eternal disgrace of the Russian name, the miscreants...
Page 27 - Prince Rupert passed from one wing to the other, giving positive orders to the horse to march as close as possible, keeping their ranks with sword in hand to receive the enemy's shot, without firing either carbine or pistol till we broke in amongst the enemy and then to make use of our fire-arms as need should require, which order was punctually observed.
Page 65 - ... atrocity without parallel in the modern warfare of civilised nations. The Russian gunners, when the storm of cavalry passed, returned to their guns. They saw their own cavalry mingled with the troopers who had just ridden over them, and, to the eternal disgrace of the Russian name, the miscreants poured a murderous volley of grape and canister on the mass of struggling men and horses, mingling friend and foe in one common ruin.
Page 27 - Bulstrode, Memoirs, p. 81. Montrose did the same at Auldearn. 'My Lord of Gordon by this time charges the left wing, and that with a new form of fight, for he discharges all shooting of pistols and carbines, only with their swords to charge quite through their enemies
Page 33 - Pie conceived his plans with the progressiveness of the rising storm and executed them with the rapidity of the thunderbolt.
Page 38 - In the old days of round shot and case a good horse artillery range was 400 yards : 200 yards was even a better. The horse artillery guns were comparatively useless unless they galloped right into a fight, and their whole energies were concentrated on getting to close quarters as soon as possible. Even on the battlefield itself, they might gallop up to within a few hundred yards of a mass of infantry, unlimber and come into action without excessive loss, then a pitiless storm of case was often more...
Page 143 - I saw my left flank taken in the rear, from the direction of the Ligny brook, by a French staff officer and about fifty horsemen. As these rushed upon us the officer shouted to me in German, "Surrender, gunners, for you are all prisoners!" With these words, he charged down with his men on the flank gun on my left, and dealt a vicious cut at my wheel driver, Borchardt, . . . who dodged it, however, by flinging himself over on his dead horse. The blow was delivered with such good will that the sabre...
Page 192 - ... not possible. To silence the attacking guns is the essential object of the artillery on the defensive, then the infantry will know how to repulse the attack of the enemy's infantry ; but artillery on the offensive should, on the contrary, make it the principal object to play upon the infantry of the enemy. An attack can only be thought of when this has been weakened.
Page 102 - ... grenadiers. We had the time to fire at them four rounds of canister from our three guns, and immediately after, Kellerman, with 400 sabres — the relic of his brigade — flew past my battery, and made a vigorous charge on the left flank of the enemy's column which laid down its arms. Had the charge been made three minutes later, our guns would have been taken or withdrawn. Had it not been for my firing, the enemy would probably have been prepared for the cavalry charge.

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