The Republic of Plato. Books I.-V.

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Macmillan and Company, 1888 - Utopias - 324 pages
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Page 222 - The light of the body is the eye : if therefore thine eye be single, thy whole body shall be full of light. But if thine eye be evil, thy whole body shall be full of darkness. If therefore the light that is in thee be darkness, how great is that darkness.
Page xlvi - And yet, steeped in sentiment as she lies, spreading her gardens to the moonlight, and whispering from her towers the last enchantments of the Middle Age, who will deny that Oxford, by her ineffable charm, keeps ever calling us nearer to the true goal of all of us, to the ideal, to perfection, — to beauty, in a word, which is only truth seen from another side?
Page 241 - And ever against eating cares, Lap me in soft Lydian airs, Married to immortal verse, Such as the meeting soul may pierce In notes, with many a winding bout Of linked sweetness long drawn out, With wanton heed, and giddy cunning, The melting voice through mazes running, Untwisting all the chains that tie The hidden soul of harmony ; That Orpheus...
Page xxii - WE cannot kindle when we will The fire which in the heart resides; The spirit bloweth and is still, In mystery our soul abides. But tasks in hours of insight willed Can be through hours of gloom fulfilled.
Page 242 - With solemn touches troubled thoughts, and chase Anguish and doubt and fear and sorrow and pain From mortal or immortal minds.
Page xxxiv - In heaven, I replied, there is laid up a pattern of it, methinks, which he who desires may behold, and beholding, may set his own house in order. But whether such an one exists, or ever will exist in fact, is no matter; for he will live after the manner of that city, having nothing to do with any other.
Page 204 - Ego deum genus esse semper dixi et dicam caelitum, Sed eos non curare opinor quid agat humanum genus ; Nam, si curent, benc bonis sit, male malis, quod nunc abest.
Page 315 - Wave after wave, each mightier than the last, Till last, a ninth one, gathering half the deep And full of voices, slowly rose and plunged Roaring, and all the wave was in a flame...
Page xiv - Maecenas, pelagoque volans da vela patenti. non ego cuncta meis amplecti versibus opto, non, mihi si linguae centum sint oraque centum, ferrea vox ; ades et primi lege litoris oram ; in manibus terrae : non hic te carmine ficto atque per ambages et longa exorsa tenebo.
Page 277 - From harmony, from heavenly harmony This universal frame began: From harmony to harmony Through all the compass of the notes it ran, The diapason closing full in Man.

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