Narrative of the campaigns of the twenty-eighth regiment, since their return from Egypt in 1802

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1835
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Page 62 - It is evident that the enemy will not fight this army, notwithstanding the superiority of his numbers, but will endeavour to harass and tease it upon its march. " The commander of the forces requests that it may be carefully explained to the soldiers that their safety depends solely upon their keeping their divisions and marching with their regiments^ that those who stop in villages or straggle on the march will inevitably be cut off by the French cavalry, who have hitherto shown little mercy even...
Page 203 - A daring fellow, an Irishman, named Tom Patten, performed a singular feat. At the barrier there was a rivulet, along which our lines of sentries were posted. To the right was a thick low wood, and during the cessation of hostilities our officers had again become intimate with those of the French, and the soldiers had actually established a traffic in tobacco and brandy in the following ingenious manner. A large stone was placed in that part of the rivulet screened by the wood, opposite to the French...
Page 204 - Two or three hours afterwards, just as we were about to fall in, an hour before daybreak, the sergeant came to say that a flag of .truce was at the barrier : I instantly went down, when I found the officer of the French picket in a state of great alarm, saying, that a most extraordinary circumstance had occurred (relating the adventure), and stating, that if the sentry's arms and accoutrements were not given back, his own commission would be forfeited, as well as the life of the poor sentry. A sergeant...
Page 199 - M'Kinlay, seeing one of them taking aim over the arm of a fig-tree in our direction, exclaimed, " Look at that rascal going to shoot our captain ! ' And, advancing one step down the hill, he presented at the Frenchman, who, however, was unfortunately too quick for him, for in an instant afterwards poor M'Kinlay was shot through the neck, and killed on the spot. The same...
Page 51 - Say it again,' said the general. 'Yes, yes!' was again exclaimed by all. 'Say it a third time.' 'Yes, yes, yes!' and a cheer followed.* The men were forgiven, the square was reduced, and the 52nd. regiment, under Colonel Barclay, went through the village in doublequick time, and in the most beautiful manner took possession * The same incident is related in the "Record of the 52nd. Light Infantry...
Page 203 - A large stone was placed in that part of the rivulet screened by the wood, opposite to the French sentry, on which our people used to put a canteen with a quarter-dollar, for which it was very soon filled with brandy. One afternoon about dusk, Patten had put down his canteen with the usual money in it, and retired, but, though he returned several times, no canteen was there. He waited till the moon rose, but still he found nothing on the stone. When it was near morning, Tom thought he saw the same...
Page 189 - During this period of mutual repose, the French officers and ours soon became intimate : we used to meet at a narrow part of the river, and talk over the campaign. They would never believe (or pretended not to believe) the reverse of Napoleon in Germany ; and when we received the news of the Orange Boven affair in Holland, they said that it was impossible to convince them. One of our officers took The Star newspaper, rolled a stone up in it, and attempted to throw it across the river ; unfortunately...
Page 221 - During the campaign, we had often experienced the most gentlemanlike conduct from the French officers. A day or two before the battle, when we were upon our alarm-post, at break of day, a fine hare was seen playing in a corn-field between the outposts ; a brace of greyhounds were very soon unslipped, when, after an excellent course, poor puss was killed within the French lines. The officer to whom the dogs belonged, bowing to the French officer, called off the dogs, but the Frenchman politely sent...
Page 204 - He had them in pawn for a canteen of brandy and a quarter-dollar ;" and told us the story in his way ; whereupon the things were immediately given over to the French captain, who, stepping behind, put two five-franc pieces into Patten's hand. Tom, however, was not to be bribed by an enemy, but generously handed the money to his officer, requesting that he would insist on the French captain taking the money back.
Page 47 - Ross was left with that excellent regiment, the 20th., and a detachment of hussars, to cover the town, while officers were employed in endeavouring to collect the stragglers. A few were got away, but many were so tired and lame from sore feet, that they did not care if the French sabres and bayonets were at their breasts, so completely did most of them give themselves up to despair. The rear-guard was at length forced to retire and leave those unfortunate people to their fate. Some of these poor...

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